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CE

CE Certified

The CE marking indicates compliance with fundamental health and safety requirements for European Directive 89/686.
The directive divides PPE into three categories, each subject to a different conformity evaluation system:

• Category 1: the manufacturer drafts a technical file and affixes the CE marking without the intervention of an external notified body.
• Category 2: the manufacturer affixes the CE marking after the notified body has performed a type examination on the basis of a technical file.
• Category 3: after the type examination, a notified body conducts a periodic inspection. Manufacturers decide whether the inspection system focuses on product sampling or on an audit of the quality system. Following inspection, the CE marking and the number of the notified body that conducted the inspection must be affixed to the product.

The European Commission describes the CE marking as a "passport" that allows manufacturers to circulate industrial products freely within the internal market of the EU. The CE marking certifies that products have met EU health, safety, and environmental requirements that ensure consumer and workplace safety. All manufacturers in the EU and abroad must affix the CE marking to products covered by the "New Approach" directives to market their products in Europe. Once a product receives a CE marking, it can be marketed throughout the EU without modification.
Most products covered by New Approach Directives can be self-certified by the manufacturer and do not require review by EU-authorized independent testing/certifying companies (i.e., Notified Bodies). To self-certify, the manufacturer must assess the conformity of the products with applicable directives and standards. While the use of EU harmonized standards is voluntary, in practice the use of EU standards is the best way to meet the requirements of the CE marking directives. This is because the standards offer specific guidelines and tests to meet safety requirements, while the directives, general in nature, do not.
The manufacturer may affix the CE marking to their products following the preparation of a declaration of conformity, which indicates that the product meets applicable requirements. Manufacturers must maintain a technical file to prove conformity and they, or their authorized representatives, must provide this together with the declaration of conformity when requested by EU authorities.
If a directive requires the involvement of a Notified Body in the conformity assessment procedure, its identification number must be displayed behind the CE logo. Doing this is the responsibility of the Notified Body.
CE marking is mandatory for certain product groups within the European Economic Area (EEA; the 28 member states of the EU plus EFTA countries Iceland, Norway, and Liechtenstein) plus Switzerland and Turkey. The manufacturer of products made within the EEA and the importer of goods made in other countries must ensure that CE-marked goods conform to all applicable standards.
By affixing the CE marking on a product, a manufacturer is declaring, at its sole responsibility, conformity with all of the legal requirements to achieve CE marking that will permit the free movement and sale of the product throughout the EEA.

EN 340 - Protective Clothing - General Requirements

(EN 13688:2013 supersedes EN 340:2004.)

This standard specifies general performance requirements for ergonomics, innocuousness, size designation, aging, compatibility, and marking of protective clothing and the information to be provided by the manufacturer with the protective clothing.
EN 340 is a reference standard and should be used in combination with other standards indicating requirements for specific performance.

More detailed requirements for protective clothing include:
• Innocuousness of the materials for the wearer.
• Ergonomic requirements for the clothing including comfort, weight, and design considerations.
• The effect of wear and tear on product performance (e.g., colour alteration, cleaning, and changes in dimension).
• Sizing is based on height, chest and waist circumferences, is standardized in accordance with EN 3635, and is detailed in the sizing pictogram that is included on each product’s label.
• Labels must be visible and legible, be written in the official language of the country of destination, and include the following information:

a) Name, trademark, or other means of manufacturer identification
b) The product’s commercial name or code
c) A pictogram and size designation according to EN 3635
d) Reference to the specific EU protective clothing standard
e) A pictogram showing the hazard the product is designed to protect the wearer against and the product’s performance level
f) Composition, care, and washing instructions using care symbols in accordance with EN 3758

Instructions for the wearer must be written in the official language of the country to which the products are being shipped and must include the following information:
a) Identification and address of manufacturer
b) Identification and address of the notified body (PPE categories 2 and 3)
c) Reference to the specific EU protective clothing standard
d) A pictogram showing the hazard the product is designed to protect the wearer against and the product’s performance level
e) The product’s material composition
f) Information for the wearer specifying safety checks that must be conducted prior use, the purpose and limitations of the product (e.g. how long the product can be used in specific working conditions), and storage, maintenance, and cleaning instructions

EN 342

EN 342 - Protective clothing - Ensembles and garments for protection against cold

(EN 342:2004 supersedes EN 342:1998 and EN 342:2000.)

Protection against temperatures lower than -5ºC
A: (U) Icler – basic thermal insulation for light / medium duty tasks 
B: (U) Icler – thermal insulation while standing still
C: Air permeability (3 levels, where 3 is best)
D: Water penetration resistance (2 levels, where 2 is best)

 

 

EN 343

EN 343 - Protective clothing - Protection against rain

(EN 343:2003/A1:2007 supersedes EN 343:2003.)

Protection against water penetration and water vapor:
• X: Water penetration (3 levels, where 3 is best)
• Y: Water vapor / breathability (3 levels, where 3 is best)

 

EN 381-5

EN 381-5 - Protective clothing for users of hand held saws - Part 5: Requirements for leg protectors

This standard specifies three types or designs of leg protection (e.g., types A, B, and C differentiated by the kind and areas of protection) for those using handheld chainsaws.

Type A – provides partial protection for both feet, with protective coverage starting 5 cm from the bottom of the leg to at least 20 cm above the escapement seam and extending 5 cm to the inside of the right leg and 5 cm to the outer side of the left leg. 

Type B – provides an additional 5 cm of protection on the inside of the left leg. 

Type C – covers the entire foot beginning more than 5 cm from the bottom of the leg to at least 20 cm above the front side seam step and to at least 50 cm below the rear of the stepper stitch.

This norm specifies 4 classes that correspond to the chain speeds used in tests:
• Class 0 : 16 m/s
• Class 1 : 20 m/s
• Class 2 : 24 m/s
• Class 3 : 28 m/s

EN 465:1995 - Protection against liquid chemicals - Performance requirements for chemical protective clothing with spray-tight seams between different parts of the clothing (type 4 equipment)

(EN 14605:2005 supersedes EN 465:1995.)

This standard specifies the performance requirements for chemical protection clothing with spray-tight seams between the clothing’s parts. Chemical protective clothing must meet the requirements of EN 340 and EN 465.

If risks to the wearer are associated with occasional splashes from corrosive and non-volatile chemicals, type 4 chemical protective clothing is sufficient when worn in combination with protective boots, gloves, and a visor. This apparel and protective equipment provide sufficient protection against commonly encountered acids and alkalis.

Type 4 Equipment:
• Individual jacket, trousers, and good worn in combination
• One-piece suit worn with a separate hood

Manufacturing and expiration dates (formatted as “month and year”) must be added to the clothing’s labels. In addition to the pictogram that denotes the clothing’s resistance to chemicals, the following capacities may be specified (note: a higher number indicates better performance):

• Abrasion resistance class (1 to 6)
• Resistance to heat blocking class (1 or 2)
• Flex cracking resistance class (1 to 5)
• Puncture resistance class (1 to 5)
• Tear resistance class (1 to 5)
• Coating adhesion strength class (1 to 5)
• Resistance to permeation by liquids class (1 to 6)
• Seam strength class (1 to 5)

EN 466-1:1995 - Protection against liquid chemicals - Performance requirements for chemical protective clothing with spray-tight seams between different parts of the clothing (type 3 equipment)

(EN 14605:2005 supersedes EN 466-1:1995.)

This standard specifies the performance requirement for chemical protection clothing with spray-tight seams between the clothing’s parts. Chemical protective clothing must meet the requirements of EN 340 and EN 466-1.

If risks to the wearer are associated with occasional splashes from corrosive and non-volatile chemicals, type 3 chemical protective clothing is sufficient when worn in combination with protective boots, gloves, and a visor. This apparel and protective equipment provide sufficient protection against commonly encountered acids and alkalis.

Type 3 Equipment:
• One-piece suit worn with an attached hood

Manufacturing and expiration dates (formatted as “month and year”) must be added to the clothing’s labels. In addition to the pictogram that denotes the clothing’s resistance to chemicals, the following capacities may be specified (note: a higher number indicates better performance):

• Abrasion resistance class (1 to 6)
• Resistance to heat blocking class (1 or 2)
• Flex cracking resistance class (1 to 5)
• Puncture resistance class (1 to 5)
• Tear resistance class (1 to 5)
• Coating adhesion strength class (1 to 5)
• Resistance to permeation by liquids class (1 to 6)
• Seam strength class (1 to 5)

EN 469

EN 469:2005 - Protective clothing for firefighters - Performance requirements for protective clothing for firefighting 

(EN 469:2005 supersedes EN 469:1995, EN 469:2006 and will be replaced by EN 469:2015 Development.)

This EU standard specifies the minimum performance requirements for protective clothing worn during firefighting operations and associated activities (e.g. rescue work, assistance during disasters). The standard outlines general clothing design, the minimum performance levels of the materials used, and the test methods used to determine these performance levels. The required performance levels may be achieved by the use of one or more garments. In addition, the standard covers the event of an accidental splash of chemical or flammable liquids but does not cover special clothing for use in other high-risk situations (e.g., reflective protective clothing) nor does it cover protection for the head, hands, and feet and protection against other hazards (e.g., chemical, biological, radiological, and electrical hazards and the hazards encountered during chemical and gas cleaning operations).

The following information must be provided on product labels (note: a higher number indicates better performance):
• The EU standard’s number and year
• The layers of clothing to be used for protection
• Pictogram (see figure)
• If applicable, maximum number of washes before material must be reimpregnated

Pictogram, accompanied by:
• Flame heat transfer index (Xf1 or Xf2)
• Radiant heat transfer index (Xr1 or Xr2)
• Water penetration resistance (Y1 or Y2)
• Water vapour resistance (Z1 or Z2)

EN 471

EN 471 - High-visibility warning clothing for professional use - Test methods and requirements

This standard details test methods and performance requirements for clothing designed to enhance the wearer’s visibility in poor and low lighting, during bad weather, and in locations with mechanical hazards. Requirements include very bright colours (e.g., fluorescents) and retroreflective features (i.e., those with high reflectivity).

Design specifications include the minimum required retroreflective surface areas and the configuration of those areas.

• X = classification of the fluorescent and retroreflective material
Classes 1 to 3 (in which 3 is the highest)

• Y = classification of the retroreflective material’s quality
Level 1 and 2 (in which 2 is the best)

EN 1149-5

EN 1149-5 - Protective clothing - Electrostatic properties - Part 5: Material performance and design requirements

EN 1149-5:2008 specifies material and design requirements for electrostatic dissipative clothing that is worn as part of a total earthed system for protection against incendiary discharges.

Please note that this standard does not encompass protections against hazards associated with mains voltages and oxygen enriched workspaces.

There are 2 different test methods in EN 1149-5:
• EN1149-1: 1995 measurement of surface resistivity (surface resistance)
• EN1149-3: 2000 measurement of charge decay

 

EN ISO 11611

EN ISO 11611:2007 - Protective clothing for use in welding and allied processes

(EN 11611 supersedes EN 470-1:1995.)

EN 11611:2007 specifies minimum basic safety requirements and test methods for protective clothing including hoods, aprons, sleeves and gaiters that are designed to protect the wearer's body, including head (hoods) and feet (gaiters), and that are to be worn during welding and allied processes with comparable risks. EN 11611:2007 does not cover requirements for hand protection.

This International Standard ensures protection against spatter (i.e., small splashes of molten metal), short contact time with flame, radiant heat from an electric arc used for welding and allied processes, and minimizes the possibility of electrical shock by short-term, accidental contact with live electrical conductors at voltages up to approximately 100 V d.c. in normal welding conditions. The garments certified in accordance with this standard are suitable for use in welding and allied processes.

EN 11611:2007 specifies 2 classes with specific performance requirements (class 1 being the lowest level; class 2 the highest).
• Class 1: protection against less hazardous welding techniques and processes, causing lower levels of spatter and radiant heat
• Class 2: protection against more hazardous welding techniques and processes, causing higher levels of spatter and radiant heat

EN ISO 11611

EN ISO 11611:2015 - Protective clothing for use in welding and allied processes

(EN 11611:2015 supersedes EN 11611:2007.)

ISO 11611:2015 specifies minimum basic safety requirements and test methods for protective clothing including hoods, aprons, sleeves, and gaiters that are designed to protect the wearer's body, including head (hoods) and feet (gaiters), and that are to be worn during welding and allied processes with comparable risks. For the protection of the wearer's head and feet, this International Standard is only applicable to hoods and gaiters. This International Standard does not cover requirements for foot, hand, face, and eye protection.

This International Standard ensures protection against spatter (i.e., small splashes of molten metal), short contact time with flame, radiant heat from an electric arc used for welding and allied processes, and minimizes the possibility of electrical shock by short-term, accidental contact with live electrical conductors at voltages up to approximately 100 V d.c. in normal welding conditions. The garments certified in accordance with this standard are suitable for use in welding and allied processes.

EN 11611:2015 specifies 2 classes with specific performance requirements (class 1 being the lowest level; class 2 the highest).
• Class 1: protection against less hazardous welding techniques and processes, causing lower levels of spatter and radiant heat
• Class 2: protection against more hazardous welding techniques and processes, causing higher levels of spatter and radiant heat

EN ISO 11612

EN ISO 11612 - Protective clothing - Clothing to protect against heat and flame

(EN ISO 11612 supersedes EN 531:1995.)

Protection against limited heat and fire, radiation, molten cast.

Markings as followed:
• A1: Limited flame spread – surface ignition
• A2: Limited flame spread – edge ignition
• B: Against convective heat (5 levels)
• C: Against radiant heat (4 levels)
• D: Against molten aluminum (3 levels)
• E: Against molten cast iron (3 levels)
• F: Against contact heat (3 levels)

EN 13034-6

EN 13034-6:2005 - Protective clothing against liquid chemicals - Type 6 or PP(6)

EN 13034-6:2005 Clothing for protection against liquid chemicals – Requirements for clothing that provides limited protection against liquid chemicals (Type 6 clothing). This standard specifies the requirements and test methods for Type 6 single- and multiple-use clothing. Type 6 clothing provides limited protection against small spatters and fumes from liquid chemicals. In general, this type of clothing is made of water-repellent but not completely waterproof material.

This clothing should be worn in combination with other garments that provide protection as defined in EN 13034. Chemical protective clothing (Type 6) must cover and protect at least the trunk and limbs (e.g. one-piece coveralls or two-piece suits, with or without hoods, boot-socks or boot-covers). Type 6 chemical protective clothing offers the lowest level of chemical protection and is intended to be used when risks have been assessed as low and a full liquid permeation barrier is not necessary (i.e. when wearers are able to take immediate and adequate action when their clothing becomes contaminated). Low risks include potential exposure to small quantities of spray or accidental low volume splashes.

Note: prolonged use of chemical protective clothing can cause heat stress!

All chemical protective clothing material is tested and classified in accordance with Table 1. The construction of seams prevents the penetration of liquid through stitch holes and through other components of a seam and must not obstruct liquid runoff.

Tests Test Method Performance requirements
Abrasion resistance EN 530-2 Class 1: > 10 cycles
Trapezoidal tear resistance ISO 9073-4 Class 1: > 10 N
Tensile strenght ISO 13934-1 Class 1: > 30 N
Puncture resistance EN 863 Class 1: > 5 N
Repellency to liquids EN 368 Class 3: > 95%
Resistance to penetration by liquids EN 368 Class 3: > 95%

EN ISO 13688 - Protective Clothing - General Requirements

(EN ISO 13688:2013 supersedes EN 340:2004.)

The standard specifies general performance requirements for ergonomics, innocuousness, size designation, aging, compatibility, and marking of protective clothing and the information to be provided by the manufacturer with the protective clothing. This standard shall be used in combination with other standards containing requirements for specific performance.

More detailed, general requirements for protective clothing include:
• Innocuousness of the materials to the wearer.
• Ergonomic requirements for the clothing including comfort, weight, and design considerations.
• The effect of wear and tear on product performance (e.g., colour alteration, cleaning, and changes in dimension).
• Sizing is based on height, chest and waist circumferences, is standardized in accordance with EN 3635, and is detailed in the sizing pictogram that is included on each product’s label. EN ISO 13688 specifies that sizing intervals should not be standardized and instead favors a “flexible” approach.

• Labels must be visible and legible, be written in the official language of the country of destination, and include the following information:
a) Name, trademark, or other means of manufacturer identification
b) The product’s commercial name or codec) A pictogram and size designation according to EN 3635
d) Reference to the specific EU protective clothing standard
e) A pictogram showing the hazard the product is designed to protect the wearer against and the product’s performance level
f) Composition, care, and washing instructions using care symbols in accordance with EN 3758
• Instructions for the wearer must be written in the official language of country to which the products are being shipped and must include the following information:
a) Identification and address of manufacturer
b) Identification and address of the notified body (PPE categories 2 and 3)
c) Reference to the specific EU protective clothing standard
d) A pictogram showing the specific hazard the product is design addresses and the product’s performance level
e) The product’s material composition
f) Information to the wearer specifying safety checks that must be conducted prior to use, the purpose and limitations of the product (e.g., how long the product can be used in specific working conditions), and storage, maintenance, and cleaning instructions

EN 13758-2

EN 13758-2:2003+A1:2006 - UV protective apparel

This standard specifies the requirements for marking clothing designed to provide the wearer with protection against solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation.

Garments marked according to EN13758-2 provide UVA + UVB protection against harmful UV rays. Prolonged exposure to the sun can cause skin damage. Wearing protective apparel designed in accordance with this standard reduces the dangers caused by UV exposure. While this apparel protects against UV radiation wearing this apparel does not guarantee protection in all conditions. Note that only areas covered by this apparel are protected and that the protection offered by this apparel may reduce with use, if stretched, or if wet. UV protective apparel should be cared for according to instructions inside each garment.

UPF Range* Protection % UV Blocking Labelling levels
15 - 24 Good 93,3 - 95,8 % 15,20
25 - 39 Very good 96 - 97,4 % 25,30,35
40 - 50+ Excellent 97,5 - 98+ % 40,45,50,50+

*UPF - Ultraviolet Protection Factor

EN ISO 13982-1

EN 13982-1:2004 - Protective clothing for use against solid particulates - Part 1: Performance requirements for chemical protective clothing that provides full-body protection against airborne solid particulates (type 5 clothing)

(EN 13982-1:2004 supersedes EN 13982-1:2000 Development.)

This part of EN 13982 specifies the minimum requirements for chemical protective clothing resistant to penetration by airborne solid particulates (type 5). These garments provide full-body protection (i.e. they cover the trunk, arms, and legs; e.g., one-piece coveralls or two-piece suits, with or without hoods or visors and with or without foot protection). Requirements for component parts, such as hoods, gloves, boots, visors, or respiratory protective equipment are specified in other International and European Standards.

This part of ISO 13982 is applicable only to airborne solid particulates. It is not applicable to other hazards created by solid chemicals (e.g. penetration of chemical dust through materials by rubbing or flexing; countering such hazards form the bases for separate standards).

Information needed on labelling inside type 5 garments:

• Manufacturer/company name
• Identification or model number
• Number and date of this standard (i.e. EN ISO 13982-1:2004)
• Year of manufacture and, if appropriate, expected shelf-life
• CE marking indicating conformity with Directive 89/686/EEC
• Size designation in conformance with EN 340
• Pictogram chemical splash – type 5 and, if tested, type 6
• Pictogram for “read instructions”
• Maintenance symbols
• Marked according to relevant standards if the garments are tested for their electrostatic properties or as radioactive particle-tight clothing, clothing providing protection against infective agents, and clothing resistant to heat and flame
• PPE category

EN 14058

EN 14058 - Protection against cold - Garments for protection in cool environments 

(EN 14058:2004 supersedes EN 14058:2000.)

This standard specifies the requirements and test methods for evaluating the performance of single garments that provide protection against the cooling of the wearer’s body in areas where the air temperature can be as low as -5 °C. The standard does not include specific requirements for headwear, footwear, or gloves.

A “cool environment” is characterized by a combination of humidity, wind, and temperatures as low as

-5°C. Some garments provide adequate protection against local body cooling (for ensembles, see EN 342) relative to the length of the wearer’s exposure to the cold, the wearer’s physiology, the composition of the wearer’s overall outfit, and specific environmental features (e.g., wind speed, temperature, humidity).

At moderate to low temperatures, garments that protect against local body cooling can be used for outdoor and indoor activities. In these instances, garments need not be made of watertight or air impermeable materials; these requirements are, then, optional for this standard. EN 14058 defines 1 criterion to ensure the proper functioning of protective clothing against the hazards of cool environments:

Thermal resistance (Rct) represents a quantity specific to textiles and indicates the amount of dry heat that can pass through a textile layer in a steady state condition as a result of a temperature gradient.

Performance requirements for air permeability (AP), resistance to water penetration (WP), and thermal insulation are optional and measured with the same criteria as EN 342.

Parameters:
a: thermal resistance (Rct), classes 1 – 3
b: air permeability, classes 1 – 3 (optional)
c: water penetration resistance classes 1 – 2 (optional)
d: thermal insulation value Icle in m²K/W (optional)
e: thermal insulation value Icle in m²K/W (optional)

EN 14605

EN 14605:2005 - Protective clothing against liquid chemicals - Type 3 or 4

(EN 14605:2005 supersedes EN 467:1995, EN 465:1995, EN 466-1:1995.)

This standard specifies performance requirements for clothing with liquid-tight (type 3) or spray-tight (type 4) seams and includes requirements for apparel that provides protection for specific parts of the body only (types PB [3] and PB [4]).

Types 3 and 4: Differences and Applications – Implications of Permeation Testing (EN 374-3 or ISO 6529)

The key difference between types 3 and 4 relates to the pressure and volume of a liquid spray:

•Type 3 is a strong jet of liquid such as that from a pressure sprayer
•Type 4 is a lighter spray such as that from a sprinkler system (i.e., substantial volume but lower in pressure)

In EN 14605 certification testing, this difference is reflected primarily in the finished garment spray test and not by any comparative mechanical property or by chemical permeation or barrier assessment tests.

Both types 3 and 4 must have sealed seams. EN 14605 requires at least one chemical permeation test on a seam (as well as the fabric) with a minimum score in class 1 (i.e. >10 minutes). No type of stitched seam will achieve this result against any chemical.

Type 3 and 4 certification also requires a permeation test on the fabric against at least one chemical with a minimum score in class 1 (i.e. >10 minutes). This standard does not specify that any particular chemical must be used for this test so, theoretically, a garment could be certified to type 3 or 4 with a permeation test against, for example, water while showing a normalised breakthrough of 11 minutes. However, a fabric with such a poor barrier against water would be unlikely to pass the finished garment spray tests.

Certification to types 3 and 4 does not indicate a general suitability for protection against any specific chemical or a general chemical protective application. An assessment of the permeation barrier against specific chemicals should be made as part of every risk assessment.

Permeation classification:
• Class 1 > 10 min
• Class 2 > 30 min
• Class 3 > 60 min
• Class 4 > 120 min
• Class 5 > 240 min
• Class 6 > 480 min

EN ISO 14116 - Protective clothing - Protection against heat and flame spread

(EN ISO 14116 supersedes EN 533:1996.)

Protection clothing of limited spread materials, material assemblies

Classification as followed:
• Index 1: hole may be formed, no flame spread, no flaming debris
• Index 2: no hole formation, no flame spread, no flaming debris, after flame / glow time > 2 seconds
• Index 3: no hole formation, no flame spread, no flaming debris, after flame / glow time < 2 seconds

EN ISO 15025:2000 - Protective clothing - Protection against heat and flame - Test Methods for limited flame spread

This standard, superseded by ISO 15025:2016, specifies the methods for measuring the limited flame spread properties of vertically-oriented textiles and industrial products in the form of single or multi-component fabrics (e.g., coated, quilted, multilayered, sandwich constructions, and similar combinations) when subjected to a small, intense flame. These test methods are not appropriate for materials that melt or shrink extensively.

These methods include two procedures:

Procedure A: surface ignition
•Position the burner perpendicular to the surface of the test fabric
•Align the axis of the burner 20mm above the line of the lower pins
•Adjust the horizontal reach of the flame to 25 mm
•Test six specimens of fabric

Procedure B: bottom edge ignition
•Position the burner below the test specimen
•Adjust inclination to a 30° angle and flame height to 40 mm
•Test six specimens of fabric

After 10 seconds of ignition, the lab must note:
1. whether the flame reaches any edge of the test fabric
2. the after flame time
3. whether afterglow spreads to the undamaged area
4. the afterglow time
5. the occurrence of debris
6. whether a hole develops

en 15025

 Procedure A                    Procedure B   

 

EN ISO 20471

EN 20471:2013 - High-visibility clothing

(EN 20471:2013 supersedes EN 471:2003/A1:2008.)

In contrast to EN 471, ISO 20471 has one value (x), which indicates the class of the product. Since reflection is featured only in the highest class, the value (y) expires in ISO 20471. High-visibility clothing requirements increase visibility during the day, twilight, in the dark, and in poor weather conditions. High-visibility clothing has a fluorescent surface and retroreflective material that meet the certification requirements of three different classes. The applicable performance class can be obtained using a single garment or a clothing ensemble (e.g., jacket and trousers). Performance requirements are included for colour, retroreflection, and minimum HV surface area. The standard also includes direction concerning where to place HV features on protective clothing.

Classification:
• X: ratio of fluorescent background material to retroreflective material (3 levels, where 3 is best)

IEC 61482-2

IEC 61482-2: 2009 Protective clothing against the thermal hazards of an electric arc.

This part of IEC 61482 specifies requirements and test methods for clothing designed to protect against hazards of an electric arc hazard and to the materials used in the production of this clothing. IEC 61482-2 includes two methods for testing. Garments can be certified according to both test methods or to one of them.

Arc Testing Methods:

1. IEC 61482-1-1:2009 supersedes IEC 61482-1:2002 - "Open Arc Test Method" (used in the USA)
The Open Arc test method (ATPV test and garment test) determines the Arc Rating Arc Thermal Protection Value (ATPV level) or Energy Break Open Threshold (EBT50) of flame-resistant material (Method A) and clothing (Method B). The basic principle is that the ATPV of the garment must be higher than the Arc Flash energy level as calculated. The "Open Arc" test method is the same as the original North American method for measuring the Arc Thermal Performance Value (ATPV) as used in ASTM F1959. The Arc Rating is expressed in cal/cm² (calories per centimetre square).

2. IEC 61482-1-2 - "Box Test Method" (used in Europe)
In the Box Test Method, materials and clothing will be tested using two methods: the material box test method and the garment box test method.
• The material box test method is used to measure and determine material response to an arc exposure when tested in a flat configuration. A quantitative measurement of arc thermal performance is made by means of the energy transmitted through the material. During this test, a fabric sample is exposed to an electric arc produced by a 4kA or 7kA short circuit. In this test, the arc does not last any longer than 500ms. The amount of heat transmitted through the sample is measured during and after the test. On the basis of the resulting data and a Stoll curve, the length of time it would take to cause the onset of second-degree burns is subsequently determined. Samples are also assessed for after-flaming, hole formation, melting, etc.
• The garment box test method is used to test the function of the protective clothing after an arc exposure (i.e., no heat flux will be measured). This test must be conducted on a complete garment. In doing this, the objective is not to determine the energetic value, but to assess the garment after exposure to an electric arc for defects in the seams, fastenings, and other closures,

The garments are tested and evaluated in two classes in the same test:
Class 1 protects against electric arc 4kA (arc energy 168 kJ)
Class 2 protects against electric arc 7kA (arc energy 320 kJ) 

The standard requires the following:
• A garment must have at least an ATPV = 4cal/cm2(167.5kJ/m2) according to IEC 61482-1-1 or Class 1 when tested according to IEC 61482-1-2
• Garments must be sewn with inherently flame-resistant threads
• If a garment has a higher rating of arc protection on the front than on the back, the garment’s torso, sleeves, and legs must be made using the arc-rated material; the back of the garment can have a lower arc rating
• Garments must have no exposed external metal (i.e., any internal metal or melting parts are to be covered inside to avoid contact with the skin)
• The garment label must show the lowest ATPV or class if the garment is comprised of different panels of material; more detailed information about areas of the garment with varying levels of protection may be provided on the garment’s label or in the manufacturer’s instructions pertaining to use
• The protective clothing material must have some minimum tensile, tear, and burst resistance and minimum dimensional stability (e.g., for wear and tear associated with cleaning)
• The protective clothing material must have lifelong flame resistance

The garments must cover the entirety of the wearer’s body. For example, a jacket and trousers must be worn together with other personal protective equipment (PPE), including a helmet with a protective visor, protective gloves, and protective footwear (i.e., work boots) to achieve the correct level of protection. Layering is very important and will increase protection (e.g., if you wear flame-retardant underwear beneath your flame-retardant garments, you are better protected).

AS/NZS 1906

AS/NZS 1906.4:2010 - Retro-reflective materials and devices for road traffic control purposes - High-visibility materials for safety garments 

This standard specifies requirements for high-visibility materials capable of signalling the user’s presence visually. The standard describes the requirements for and physical properties of photometric and colorimetric high-visibility materials for use outdoors during daylight hours (class F), retro-reflective materials for use at night or in other low-light conditions (class R), and a combination of the two.

Classes:
• Class F – High daytime visibility fluorescent material/ fabric.
• Class F (W) – High daytime visibility fluorescent material that has met both the requirements for Class F material and an optional wet weather test.
• Class R – Retro-reflective material for use in garments used in low-light conditions.
• Class RF – Combined performance retro-reflective/fluorescent material that meets the requirements of Class R and the daytime colour of Class F.
• Class NF – High daytime visibility non-fluorescent material.

AS/NZS 4399

AS/NZS 4399:1996 - Sun protective clothing - Evaluation and classification

Protective clothing that provides protection against solar ultraviolet radiation exposure (UVA and UVB).This means that the clothing’s fabric blocks more than 98% of harmful UV radiation.

UPF levels:
• UPF 15,20                               = Good protection
• UPF 25,30,35                          = Very good protection
• UPF 40, 45, 50, 50+                = Excellent Protection

ASTM F1506

ASTM F1506 - Protection for electrical workers exposed to momentary electric arc and related thermal hazards

This specification provides performance requirements for clothing worn by electric utility workers and other personnel working around energised parts. In addition to non-thermal requirements, the standard requires the fabric to be FR. FR here is measured using ASTM D6413 Vertical Flame Test (maximum 2.0 seconds after flame and 6.0 inch char length). The arc rating is either Arc Thermal Performance Value (ATPV) or Arc Break-open Value (Ebt = cal/cm²) as measured by the ASTM F1959-06ae1 Arc Thermal Performance Test.

The standard has a general requirement that thread, bindings, and closures do not contribute to the wearer’s injuries in an electric arc exposure. Knit or woven fabrics may not melt and drip or have more than 2.0 seconds after flame or 6.0 inches char length. Arc ratings must appear on garment labels.

NFPA 70E

NFPA 70E - Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace 

NFPA 70E helps companies and employees avoid workplace injuries and fatalities due to shock, electrocution, arc flash, and arc blast. Employees’ equipment contains flame-resistant clothing, which meets the requirements of ASTM F1506.

The NFPA 70E standard provides tables of common electrical tasks, which are assigned one of five Hazard Risk Categories (HRC 0, 1, 2, 3 or 4). Each HRC category has a minimum arc rating for protective clothing measured in cal/cm² plus other PPE requirements.

Arc Thermal Performance Value (ATPV), a value of the energy necessary to pass through any given fabric to cause with 50% probability a second- or third- degree burn. This value is measured in calories/cm². ATPV indicates the level of protection provided by flame-resistant clothing as measured in cal/cm²: the higher the ARC rating, the greater the protection.

Hazard Risk Category (HRC) is the level of arc flash protection clothing you must wear to protect against a minimum level of incident energy measured in calories per centimetre squared.

HRC 1 (low risk), up to HRC 4 (high risk, requiring FR clothing with a minimum arc rating of 40). The HRC is used to determine the necessary arc rating of a garment worn during a given job task. Wearing multiple layers of clothing may be required to obtain the necessary rating for your work.

NFPA 2112 - ASTM F1930

NFPA 2112:2012 - Standard on Flame-Resistant Garments for Protection of Industrial Personnel Against Flash Fire

Standard for Flame-Resistant (FR) Garments for Protection of Industrial Personnel against Flash Fire

This standard specifies the minimum performance requirements and test methods for FR fabrics and components and the design and certification requirements for garments developed to protect workers from a flash fire hazard. It requires FR fabrics to pass a comprehensive number of thermal tests.

Including the following tests:
• ASTM D6413 - Vertical Flammability Test – maximum 2.0 seconds after flame and 4.0 inch char length.
• ASTM F1930 - Thermal Mannequin Test - maximum predicted body burn after 3.0 second thermal exposure.
• ASTM F2700 - Heat Transfer Performance (HTP) test - minimum HTP of 6.0 cal/cm2 spaced and 3.0 cal/cm2 contact.
• Thermal Stability Test - fabric must not melt or drip, separate or ignite after 2.0 minutes in a 260° C (500° F) oven.
• AATCC 135 - Thermal Shrinkage Test - fabric must not shrink more than 10% after 5.0 minutes in a 260° C (500° F) oven.

EN 374-1

EN 374-1:2003 Gloves providing protection against chemicals and microorganisms – Part 1: Terminology and performance requirements

This standard specifies the requirements for gloves that protect the wearer against chemicals and microorganisms and defines relevant terminology. The standard should be used in conjunction with EN 420 and is superseded by NEN EN ISO 374-1:2016 Gloves providing protection against dangerous chemicals and microorganisms – Part 1: Terminology and performance requirements for chemical risks. Accordingly, this standard indicates the capacities of gloves to protect the wearer against chemicals and microorganisms.

Definitions:
Degradation is determined according to the change in a material’s integrity following its exposure to chemicals. The rate of degradation depends on the chemical the glove has come in contact with.
Penetration is the flow of chemicals and microorganisms through porous materials, seams, small holes, and material defects.
Permeation occurs when a chemical passes through a material on a molecular level and is defined as the penetration of a chemical’s molecule through a glove’s outer surface. This process takes place in three phases:
•Absorption of the flow of molecules in contact with the glove’s outer surface
•Diffusion of molecules through the glove’s material
•Desorption or the outward flow of molecules from inside the glove

The waterproof/low chemical resistance pictogram:
EN374 1
The waterproof/low chemical resistance pictogram appears on gloves that have not achieved an EN 374-3 breakthrough time of, at minimum, 30 minutes against at least three of the 12 designated chemicals indicated in the EN 374-2 penetration test list.

The chemical resistance pictogram:
EN374 2 
      ABC
The chemical resistance pictogram must be accompanied by a code, generally consisting of three letters, that indicates which of the 12 designated chemicals the glove has achieved a breakthrough time of at least 30 minutes against (see EN 374-3). 

The microorganism glove pictogram:
EN374 3

The microorganism pictogram indicates that a glove has achieved a performance level of X through the penetration test described in EN 374-2.

EN 374-2

EN 374-2: 2014 Gloves that provide protection against dangerous chemicals and microorganisms – Part 2: Determining resistance to penetration

EN 374-2:2014 specifies the test methods for determining the penetration resistance of gloves that protect against dangerous chemicals and microorganisms. The microorganism pictogram indicates that glove is waterproof, resistant to microorganisms, and an effective barrier against the liquids that harbor microorganisms. Protection levels assigned to EN 374-2 gloves range from 1 to 3, with 1 being the lowest and 3 being the highest (e.g., gloves assigned a protection rating of 1 are waterproof while gloves with ratings of 2 and 3 provide protection against microorganisms). 

Requirements:
• Minimum liquid proof section: the size of this section of the glove must equal the length specified in EN 420.
• Penetration: a glove must not leak when subjected to an air and/or water leak test and must be evaluated against the acceptable quality level (AQL).

Performance level AQL unit Inspection levels
Level 3  <0.65 G1
Level 2 <1.5 G1
Level 1 <4.0 S4

 

EN 374-3

EN 374-3: 2003 Gloves providing protection against chemicals and microorganisms – Part 3: Determination of resistance to permeation by chemicals

This standard specifies the methods used to determine the resistance of protective glove materials to permeation by potentially hazardous non-gaseous chemicals that the glove has been in continuous contact with. Since these test methods do not endeavor to replicate conditions likely to be found on worksites, use of the results from these tests should be restricted to general comparisons of materials’ durability (e.g., breakthrough times). Gloves with the chemical resistant symbol have attained a level 2 protection score in the EN 374-2 test (see EN 374-2) in which gloves must achieve the same protection scores when exposed to water and any three of the following chemicals:

 Code letter  Chemical  CAS number  Category
 A  Methanol  67-56-1  Primary alcohol
 B  Acetone 67-64-1  Ketone 
 C  Acetonenitrile 75-05-8   Nitrile compound
 D  Dichloromethane 75-9-2   Chlorinated paraffin
 E  Carbon disulfide 75-15-0  Sulphur containing organic compound
 F  Toluene 108-88-3  Aromatic hyrdrocarbon
 G  Diethylamine  109-89-7  Amine
 H  Tetrhydrofuran (THF)  109-99-9  Heterocyclic and ethereal
 I  Ethyl acetate 141-78-6   Ester
 J n-Heptane 142-85-5   Saturated hydrocarbon
 K  Sodium hydroxide 40%  1310-73-2  Inorganic base
 L  Sulfuric acid 96%  7664-93-9  Inorganic mineral acid

 

Permeation: Each chemical tested is classified according to its breakthrough time (i.e., performance levels 0 to 6)

 Measured breakthrough time  Production index  Measured breakthrough time  Protection index
 >10 mitues  Class 1  >120 minutes  Class 4
 >30 minutes  Class 2  >240 minutes  Class 5
 >60 minutes  Class 3  >480 minutes  Class 6
EN 388

EN 388 - Gloves protecting against mechanical hazards 

(EN 388:2016 supersedes 388:2003.)

This European Standard specifies requirements, test methods, marking, and information that must be provided for gloves that protect against abrasion, blade cut, tear, and puncture. This standard is applicable only in conjunction with EN 420. The test methods described in this standard may apply to protective equipment (e.g., arm protectors) that does not constitute a glove or apparel. 

In accordance with EN 388:2004, all tests must be conducted on the material in the glove’s palm area and on the material combination used in the glove’s construction.

Protection against mechanical hazards is expressed by a pictogram followed by four numbers (i.e., performance levels), each representing test performance against a specific hazard.

A - Resistance to abrasion
Based on the number of cycles required to abrade through the sample glove (e.g., abrasion by sandpaper under a specified pressure). The protection factor is then indicated on a scale from 1 to 4 depending on how many revolutions are required to make a hole in the material. The higher the number, the better the protection (See table below.)
B - Blade cut resistance
Based on the number of cycles required to cut through the sample glove at a constant speed. The protection factor is then indicated on a scale from 1 to 5.
C - Tear resistance
Based on the amount of force required to tear the sample. The protection factor is then indicated on a scale from 1 to 4.
D - Puncture resistance
Based on the amount of force required to pierce the sample with a standard-sized point. The protection factor is then indicated on a scale from 1 to 4.

Note: results marked with an X indicate that the glove was not tested against this hazard is not tested; results marked with an O indicate that the glove did not pass the test.

Levels of performance:

Test Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5
Abrasion resistance (No. of cycles) 100 500 2000 8000 -
Blade cut resistance (Index) 1,2 2,5 5,0 10,0 20,0
Tear resistance (Newton) 10 25 50 75 -
Puncture resistance (Newton) 20 60 100 150 -

 

The 2016 update to EN 388 retains the four categories (A to D) and specifies additional hazard categories:
E – Blade cut resistance (EN ISO 13997)
Using only sharpened straight blades (i.e., no dull or dulling blades), this test measures the durability of the sample glove against cut-through inside a distance of 20mm, allowing for the calculation of a score from A to F, with F being the highest rating. This test is used primarily for specialized products (e.g., firefighters’ gloves).

F – Impact protection
The letter P is used to indicate that a sample glove has passed the impact protection test. Conversely, the letter F is used to indicate that a sample glove has failed the impact protection test.

  Test A B C D E F
E EN ISO 13997 (Newton)  2 3 5 15 22 30
F Impact protection  Passed (P) or Failed (F)

 

 EN 388

Warning! Observe caution when working with moving mechanical parts as material can become entangled and cause injury. Gloves must not be worn if there is a risk of entanglement by moving mechanical parts.

 

EN 407

EN 407 Gloves providing protection against thermal risks (heat and/or fire)

EN 407:2004 specifies the requirements, test methods, information to be supplied, and marking for gloves that provide protection against heat and/or fire. This should be used for gloves that protect the hands against heat and/or flames in one or more of the following forms: fire, contact heat, convective heat, radiant heat, small splashes, and large quantities of molten metal. This standard is applicable only in conjunction with EN420. Product tests may indicate performance levels but not protection levels.

The nature and degree of protection is shown by a pictogram followed by a series of six performance levels that relate to specific protective qualities. The higher the number, the better the test result. The following product features are those tested relative to the specifications of this standard:

A: Resistance to flammability (performance level 0-4)
The glove’s material is stretched and lit with a gas flame. The flame is held against the material for 15 seconds. After the flame is distinguished, the time that the material glows or burns is measured.

B: Resistance to contact heat (performance level 0-4)
The glove’s material is exposed to temperatures between 100°C and 500°C to determine the amount of time required for the material on the inside of the glove to increase by 10°C from the starting temperature (approx. 25°C). 15 seconds is the minimum accepted length of time for approval. For example: to be marked with class 2, the glove’s inside material must withstand 250°C heat for 15 seconds before the material exceeds 35°C.

C: Resistance to convective heat (performance level 0-4)
The glove is placed in contact with a gas flame (80Kw/kvm) to determine the amount of time required to increase the temperature of a glove’s inside material by 24°C.
A score is indicated only if the sample obtains a performance level of 3 or 4 in the flammability test.

D: Resistance to radiant heat (performance level 0-4)
The glove’s material is stretched in front of a heat source with an effect of 20-40 kw/kvm to measure the average time for 2.5 kw/kvm of heat penetration.
A score is indicated only if the sample obtains a performance level of 3 or 4 in the flammability test.

E: Resistance to small splashes of molten metal (performance level 0-4)
This test is used to determine the number of drops of molten metal that will increase the temperature between the inside of the glove and the wearer’s skin by 40°C.
A score is indicated only if the sample obtains a performance level of 3 or 4 in the flammability test.

F: Resistance to large splashes of molten metal (performance level 0-4)
After simulated skin is affixed to the inside of the sample glove. Molten metal is then poured over the glove to determine what quantity will damage the simulated skin. If molten metal droplets remain stuck to the glove or if the glove ignites, the sample glove will receive a score of 0.

 

 Performance levels  1  2  3  4
 A  Burning behavior – after-burn time  ≤ 20 s  ≤ 10 s  ≤ 3 s  ≤ 2 s
 A  Burning behavior – afterglow time   no requirement  ≤ 120 s  ≤ 25 s  ≤ 5 s
 B  Contact heat – contact temperature  100°C  250°C  350°C  500°C
 B  Contact heat – threshold time  ≥ 15  ≥ 15 ≥ 15  ≥ 15
 C  Convective heat (heat transfer delay)  ≤ 4 s  ≤ 7 s  ≤ 10 s  ≤18 s
 D  Radiant heat (heat transfer delay)  ≤ 7 s  ≤ 20 s  ≤ 50 s  ≤ 95 s
 E  Drops of molten metal (number of drops)  ≥ 10  ≥ 15  ≥ 25  ≥ 35
 F  Large quantity of molten metal (mass)  30 g  60 g  120 g  200 g

≥ = greater than or equal to | ≤ = less than or equal to l

X indicates that the test is not applicable

407

                                     

EN 420

EN 420:2003+A1:2009 - Protective gloves - General requirements and test methods

This standard defines the general requirements and relevant test procedures for glove design and construction, resistance to water penetration, innocuousness, comfort and dexterity, marking, and information supplied by the manufacturer that is applicable to all protective gloves. This European Standard does not address the protective properties of gloves and therefore should be used in combination with the appropriate European standards.

This standard describes the following requirements:
• Gloves must offer the greatest possible degree of protection
• If the glove features seams, they should not reduce the glove’s performance
• pH levels should be between 3.5 and 9.5
• Chromium (VI) content should be below detection (< 3ppm)
• Natural rubber gloves should be tested on extractable proteins to ensure they do not cause allergic reactions
• If cleaning instructions are provided, the level of performance must not be reduced even after the maximum number of washes

EN 420 also concerns the glove’s overall fit and feel by testing:
• Sizing and length
• Finger dexterity 

Sample gloves are suspended from their middle fingers and measured from the fingertip to the bottom of the cuff to determine their length. EN 420 includes a list of minimum lengths for each glove size. Variances (i.e., gloves designed for specific purposes) are permitted provided the manufacturer can demonstrate the design’s intent.

Overall glove sizing and dexterity are also tested. Gloves are fitted on the appropriate hand sizes. The wearer will then try to pick up pins of varying sizes to measure the glove’s dexterity. These pins range in size from 5mm to 11mm in diameter; the smaller the diameter, the greater the glove’s dexterity.

The levels of performance are as follows: 1 = minimum, 2 = good, 3 = very good, 4 and 4+ = excellent, 0 = no protection, X = performance not measured.

Working gloves are divided into three categories:
Category I: Gloves designed to protect against minimal risks only
Examples of glove types are household gloves for cleaning and for protection against warm objects or temperatures that do not exceed 50⁰C, gloves for gardening, and light duty cotton or leather gloves. The gloves are tested and certified in accordance with EN 420. This standard defines the general requirements for protective gloves and establishes a guarantee for CE marking. Manufacturers are permitted to test and certify gloves themselves.

Category II: Gloves designed to protect against intermediate risks
Gloves in this category provide protection against risks that are more severe that minimal but not considered mortal. These gloves must be subjected to independent testing and certification by a Notified Body, who then issues a CE marking indicating the glove’s protective capacities. Gloves in this category are general handling gloves requiring good puncture and abrasion performance in accordance with EN 388.

Category III: Gloves with complex designs that protect against irreversible injuries and mortal risks
Gloves in this category are designed to protect against the highest levels of risk (e.g. highly corrosive acids) and must be independently tested and certified by a Notified Body approved by the European Commission.

EN 421

EN 421:2010 Gloves that protect against ionizing radiation and radioactive contamination

This European Standard specifies the requirements and test methods for gloves that protect against ionizing radiation and radioactive contamination. The standard applies to gloves that provide hand protection and protection for arms and shoulders, gloves that are mounted in permanent containment enclosures, and intermediary sleeves used between gloves and permanent containment enclosures (report to 4.7.2.3). The requirements of this European Standard do not apply to gloves that protect against X-ray radiation.

Definitions and requirements.
Protection and protective qualities are indicated by pictograms:

EN421
Pictogram indicting protection against radioactive particles

EN421 2
Pictogram indicating protection against ionizing radiation

• To protect against radioactive contamination, the glove has to be liquid-proof and must pass the penetration test defined in EN 374.
• In addition, gloves used in containment enclosures must pass an air pressure leak test and must provide a high level of resistance against water vapor penetration (1 = most; 5= least).
• Materials may be modeled according to their resistance to ozone cracking. This test is optional and can be used as an aid in glove selection (1 = least; 4 = most).
• To protect from ionizing radiation, gloves must contain specific amounts of lead or equivalent metals (i.e., lead equivalence). Lead equivalence must be marked on each glove with a measurement in millimeters and a statement concerning test conditions.

EN 511

EN 511 Gloves that protect against cold

EN 511:2006 specifies the requirements and test methods for gloves that protect against convective and conductive cold to -50°C. This cold can be linked to weather conditions or to industrial activity. The values assigned to performance levels are decided by the requirements for each risk class and by the specific areas of application. These tests indicate product performance levels though not levels of protection.

EN 511:2006 Definition and requirements
These gloves are designed to protect the wearer’s hands against cold. The material combination used in the gloves’ construction is tested in accordance with EN 511. Gloves’ insulating properties may be affected by for air temperature, humidity, wind speed, time of exposure, activity level, and the wearer’s health and wellbeing (e.g., wetness can compromise gloves’ insulating properties).

Gloves that pass the tests specified in this standard must also attain at least a performance level of 1 in the EN 388 abrasion and tear tests. If gloves attain less than a performance level of 2, then their resistance to both convective cold and contact cold must be reported as, maximum, level 1.

The pictogram will be accompanied by a 3-character code:
a - Resistance to convective cold = based on the gloves’ insulating properties, this measures the transfer of cold through convection (performance levels 0 to 4, with 4 being the highest).
b- Resistance to contact cold = based on the gloves’ thermal capacity when in contact with a cold object (performance levels 0 to 4, with 4 being the highest).
c- Permeability to water = gloves’ capacity to resist water penetration (0 = fail; 1= pass).
0 = water penetration after 5 minutes (replaces the previous standard of 30 min).
1 = no water penetration after 5 minutes (replaces the previous standard of 30 min).
Note: gloves that receive a score of 0 on this test may perform well in the other test areas and, by extension, may still earn the accreditation.
X = gloves that have not been tested

EN 659

EN 659:2003+A1:2008 - Protective gloves for firefighters 

This European Standard defines the minimum performance requirements and test methods for firefighters’ protective gloves and applies only to gloves that protect the wearer’s hands during normal firefighting operations (e.g., search and rescue). While these gloves are not intended for the deliberate handling of liquid chemicals, they do provide some protection against accidental contact. Protective gloves designed for specific firefighting operations are excluded from the scope of this standard. 

General requirements
Firefighters’ protective gloves must conform to the general requirements of EN 420, excluding minimum glove lengths (see Table 1 below).

If parts of the palm and/or parts of the back of the glove are made from different materials, these materials must be tested separately. In instances where the sample size is significantly larger than the part of the glove being tested, the manufacturer must supply samples of the materials in question. After each thermal test, the material used for the innermost lining must be visually inspected. If there is evidence of melting, the glove will have failed the test.

Table 1

Glove size 6 7 8 9 10 11
Fits Hand size 6 Hand size 7 Hand size 8 Hand size 9 Hand size 10 Hand size 11
Minimum length of glove (mm) 260 270 280 290 305 315

 

EN 659:2003+A1:2008 - implies the following performance levels

Property Minimum performance level Norm
Abrasion resistance Level 3 (2000 cycles), palm EN 388
Cut resistance Level 2 (index 2,5), palm/back of the hand EN 388
Tear resistance Level 3 (50N), palm EN 388
Puncture resistance Level 3 (100N), palm EN 388
Burning resistance Level 4 After flame time ≤ 2s After glow time ≤ 5s EN 407
Convection heat resistance Level 3 (HTI24 ≥ 13), palm/back of the hand EN367 / EN 407
Radiant heat resistance RHTI24 at heat flux 40 kW/m2 ≥ 20 sec, back of the hand EN 6942
Contact heat resistance At least 10 sec at 250°C, palm (dry/humid environment) EN 702
Heat resistance of lining Material must not melt, burst into flames, drop away at temperature of 180°C ISO 17493
Shrinkage due to heat Max 5% at a temperature of 180 °C (length/width) ISO 17493
Dexterity Level 1 EN 420
Strength of seams Min 350 N EN 13935-2
Time to take the glove off Max 3 sec (dry/humid environment EN 15383
Resistance to water penetration 1-4 = optional test EN 15383/ EN 20811
Test for intactness of the entire glove Optional EN 15383
Resistance to penetration of liquid chemicals Optional (no chemicals may penetrate for 10s) EN 6530
EN ISO 10819

EN ISO 10819:2013 - Mechanical vibration and shock - Hand-arm vibration - Measurement and evaluation of the vibration transmissibility of gloves at the palm of the hand

This International Standard specifies a method for the laboratory measurement, data analysis, and reporting of the vibration transmissibility of gloves with vibration-reducing material that covers the palm, fingers, and thumb.
This standard specifies vibration transmissibility as vibration transmitted from a handle through a glove to the palm in one-third octave frequency bands with center frequencies of 25 Hz to 1 250 Hz. The measurement procedure specified in this standard can also be used to measure the vibration transmissibility of materials being evaluated for use as handle covers for machines or for potential use in glove manufacturing. Results from this test, however, should not be used to certify that a material used as a handle cover will meet this standard’s requirements as they pertain to anti-vibration coverings. While materials tested through this method could be used in glove production, to be classified as an anti-vibration glove, gloves must be tested and certified in accordance with the measurement procedures detailed in this standard (e.g., vibration attenuation performance requirements).

In accordance with ISO 10819, the vibration reduction criteria for an anti-vibration glove are:
TRM < 1.0 (TRM = the overall transmissibility of vibration using a spectrum called “M” [31.5 Hz -200 Hz])
TRH < 0.6 (TRH = the overall transmissibility when using a spectrum called “H” [200 Hz - 1 kHz])
These requirements indicate that in the medium frequency range, an anti-vibration glove must not increase the vibration. In the high frequency range, the glove’s overall effect must be the reduction of the frequency-weighted vibration by at least 40%.
This standard also requires that the resilient, or vibration-damping, material must be placed in the glove’s palm, full finger, and thumb stalls.

Injuries that can occur due to exposure to mechanical vibration and shock are the blanching of fingers, spasms, numbness, and loss of coordination and dexterity. These symptoms are exacerbated by cold temperatures and can last between five and 15 minutes. This increasingly debilitating condition can disable workers and, in extreme cases, result in limb amputation.
To minimize the risk of injuries, specifically the onset of Hand-Arm Vibration Syndrome (HAVS), please consider the following options: lower the vibration exposure action value (EAV) or exposure limit value (ELV); wear anti-vibration gloves; or decrease vibration exposure time by developing more efficient processes or by introducing job rotation.

EN 12477

EN 12477 - Protective gloves for welders

This International Standard describes the design specifications for gloves that provide hand and wrist protection for welding and for similar work and should be referred to in conjunction with EN 388 and EN 407. This standard is applicable only in combination with EN 420, excluding that standard’s specifications concerning minimum glove length. Welding gloves must provide protection against mechanical hazards as well as small splashes of molten metal, short contact exposure to limited flame, short exposure to convective heat, against UV radiant heat from arc and against contact heat.

According to their comparative performance levels, protective gloves for welders are divided into two categories:
Type A = gloves that provide a high degree of protection against heat but are less flexible
Type B = gloves that provide a lower degree of protection against heat but are more flexible
Marking conforms to specifications in EN 420 and to the pictograms in EN 388 and EN 407.

 

 Table – Minimum lengths in mm for welding gloves:

 Glove size  6  7  8  9  10  11
 Fits  Hand size 6  Hand size 7  Hand size 8  Hand size 9  Hand size 10  Hand size 11
 Minimum length of glove (mm)  300  310  320  330  340  350

 

Table – EN 388 minimum mechanical performance levels: 

 EN388  Type A  Type B
 Abrasion resistance  2  1
 Cut resistance  1  1
 Tear resistance  2  1
 Puncture resistance  2  1

 

Table – EN 407 minimum thermal performance levels:

 EN 407  Type A   Type B
 Burning behaviour  3 (3s / 25s)  2 (10s / 120s)
 Contact heat resistance  1 (100⁰C / 15s)  1 (100⁰ / 15s)C
 Convection heat resistance  2 (7s)  -
 Drops of molten metal (number of drops)  3 (25 drops)  2 (15 drops)

Lining will be checked after each thermal test and must not melt.
Glove material must not ignite when in contact with drops of molten metal.

EN 60903

EN 60903 - Live working - Electrical insulating gloves

EN 60903:2003 - Gloves and mitts of insulating material for live working, corrected 2004 and 2006.

This European Standard specifies the requirements and test methods for gloves and wiring gloves intended for use by workers exposed to high-tension electrical voltage. This standard and does not make reference to other glove standards, such as EN 420 (general requirements), EN 388 (mechanical risks), or EN 374 (chemical risks).

Gloves that are manufactured and certified according to EN standard 60903 are the only gloves that should be used when there is a risk of electrical shock. To help determine which gloves provide the best protection, it is important to know gloves’ capacities relative to different voltage levels.

To limit the effects of wear and tear (e.g., contact with sharp cables), specially designed protective gloves can and should be worn over electrical insulating gloves.

 

Class Tested at Working voltage
00 2.500V 500V
0 5.000V 1.000V
1 10.000V 7.000V
2 20.000V 17.000V
3 30.000V 26.000V
4 40.000V 36.000V

 

Optional:

Category optional Additional requirements
A Acid resistance
H Oil resistance
Z Ozone resistance
M Resistance against high mechanical strain
R Resistance against acid, oil, ozone, and high mechanical strain
C Resistance against extreme cold

 

Insulating protective gloves require inspections every 6 months and should be subjected to the following:

Classes 00 and 0 – examination to detect air leaks and visual inspection

Classes 1 to 4 – examination to detect air leaks, visual inspection, and electrical test

 

Protective gloves should be individually packaged. This packaging must be durable enough to protect the gloves against damages that may occur during shipment (e.g., prolonged exposure to direct sunlight, excessive moisture, temperatures above and below room temperature). Furthermore, the protective gloves’ safety markings must be displayed prominently on the packaging.

ANSI 105

ANSI/ISEA 105-2011: Clause 5.1: Mechanical protection

This ANSI details the methods for testing and classifying hand protection designed for use against industrial chemical hazards.

The tests measure resistance to cuts, punctures, and abrasions:

Levels of performance:
• Cut resistance: levels 1-5
• Puncture resistance: levels 1-5
• Abrasion resistance: level 1-6
1 is the lowest level; 5 and 6 are the highest levels

ANSI/ISEA 105-2011: Clause 5.6: Dexterity

Levels of performance:
• 1 - 5
1 is the lowest level; 5 is the highest level

ASTM D120

ASTM D120 - Standard Specification for Insulating Gloves Made of Rubber

This standard describes manufacturing and testing processes for insulating gloves made of rubber designed to protect wearers from electrical shock and defines the minimum electrical, chemical, and physical properties of voltage-rated gloves.

ASTM requires gloves to be manufactured within similar hand dimensions, plus or minus ½” per measurement. This allowance provides manufacturers with the opportunity to select a set of unique dimensions.

Two types of gloves are detailed in this standard:

Type I: non-resistant to ozoneType II: resistant to ozone

Six classes of gloves, differentiated by their electrical characteristics, are detailed in this:

Class 00, Class 0, Class 1, Class 2, Class 3, Class 4

The following tests must be performed:

AC proof testAC breakdown testAC moisture absorption/proof testDC proof testDC breakdown testOzone resistance testChemical testsTensile strengthTear resistance testPuncture resistance test

Electrical safety gloves are categorized by their capacity to provide voltage protection and to provide a resistance to ozone. To select the proper level of hand protection, use the chart below to determine the maximum voltage that the wearer will be exposed to during work. Each glove class is clearly marked with the maximum use voltage on the permanent color-coded label. 

Class Test AC Volts Use AC Volts Test DC Volts Use DC Volts Label Color
00 2500 500 10000 750 Beige
0 5000 1000 20000 1500 Red
1 10000 7500 40000 11250 White
2 20000 17000 50000 25500 Yellow
3 30000 26500 60000 39750 Green
4 40000 36000 70000 54000 Orange

Voltage rated gloves should always be purchased with leather protectors and a storage container.

To protect the wearer properly, a glove system consists of:

Rubber insulating gloves – classified by the level of voltage protection they provide.

Liner gloves – reduce the discomfort of insulating gloves made of rubber. Liners provide warmth in cold temperatures and absorb perspiration during work in warmer temperatures. They can have a straight cuff or knitted wrist.

Leather protector gloves – worn over insulating gloves made of rubber to protect against cuts, abrasions, and punctures.

Leather protectors:

In the ASTM standards specifying the characteristics of leather protector gloves, there are regulations concerning how much of the rubber glove can be exposed at the top (i.e., near the cuff.) Due to this, certain leather protector gloves are used with specific classes of rubber gloves according to their length (see below). Note: these protectors are not interchangeable with different classes of rubber gloves.

Class 00 & 0 must have no less than a ½” gap between the top of the glove and the top of the leather protector.Class 1 must have no less than a 1” gap between the top of the glove and the top of the leather protector.Class 2 must have no less than a 2” gap between the top of the glove and the top of the leather protector.Class 3 must have no less than a 3” gap between the top of the glove and the top of the leather protector.Class 4 must have no less than a 4” gap between the top of the glove and the top of the leather protector.

Marking requirements on label:

Size, Manufacturer, ANSI/ASTM standard, Country of origin, Class, Type, Max Use Volt AC/ ColorCuff design, Length

Gloves should be worn within 12 months of their test date to ensure full protection against specified hazards. Unused gloves may be retested and, pending recertification, should be used within 12 months.

EN 12568 - Foot and leg protectors: Requirements and test methods for toecaps and penetration-resistant inserts

NEN-EN-ISO 12568:2010: This international standard describes the requirements and test methods for toecaps and penetration-resistant inserts

This European Standard specifies the requirements and test methods for toecaps and inserts that provide resistance against mechanical penetration and function as components of PPE footwear (e.g. as described by EN ISO 20345, EN ISO 20346, and EN ISO 20347).

Types of toecaps:
• Internal toecap – a toecap that is incorporated into the footwear and positioned underneath the upper
• External toecap- a toecap that is incorporated into the footwear and positioned on top of the upper

Marking
Toecaps
Toecaps must be clearly and permanently marked with the following information:
a) Toecap size (5 up to and including 10)
b) Left or right
c) Manufacturer's identification mark
d) Manufacturer's type designation
e) S or 200 J (for safety toecaps)
P or 100 J (for protective toecaps)
f) The number of this standard

Penetration-resistant inserts
a) Insert size
b) Manufacturer's identification mark
c) Manufacturer's type designation
d) The number of this standard

NOTE: embossed marking is acceptable

EN 13832-2

EN 13832-2:2006 - Footwear protecting against chemicals – Part 2: Requirements for footwear’s resistance to chemicals under laboratory conditions

EN 13832-2: 2006 this standard specifies the requirements for footwear that protects the wearer against specific chemicals. This standard does not apply to footwear with leather outsoles.
Part 2 of EN 13832 affords footwear designers greater flexibility than part 3 by not restricting the choice of material types, save the exclusion of designs with leather outsoles, and by allowing ankle boot styles to be evaluated in testing.

EN 13832-2:2006 details the degradation testing procedure only. Footwear in compliance with this standard resists degradation by at least 2 of the following chemicals:
• B – acetone
• D – dichloromethane
• F – toluene
• G – diethylamine
• H – tetrahydrofuran
• I – ethyl acetate
• J – n-heptane
• K – 30% sodium hydroxide
• L – 95% sulphuric acid
• M – 65% nitric acid
• N – 99% acetic acid
• O– 25% ammonia solution
• P – 30% hydrogen peroxide solution
• Q – isopropanol
• R – 13% sodium hypochlorite

EN 13832-3

EN 13832-3:2006 - Footwear protecting against chemicals - Part 3: Requirements for footwear with a high level of resistance to chemicals under laboratory conditions

EN 13832-3:2006 this standard specifies requirements for all-rubber and all-polymeric footwear designed to provide a high level of resistance to specific chemicals. This footwear resists both degradation (by at least 3 chemicals in the list provided) and permeation (i.e., providing at least Level 1 resistance against 3 of the chemicals listed). This standard specifically excludes leather footwear and low shoe and ankle boot designs.
Part 3 of EN 13832 describes the situations where the wearer is advised to select high-resistance footwear (e.g., when working with especially aggressive chemicals). Unlike part 2, part 3 requires that tests be conducted on footwear’s resistance to chemical permeation and chemical degradation resistance and includes five performance levels.

Performance levels:
Level 1 - 121 to 240 minutes
Level 2 - 241 to 480 minutes
Level 3 - 481 to 1440 minutes
Level 4 - 1441 to 1920 minutes
Level 5 - >1921 minutes

Stated chemicals (at least 3 from the list below):
• B – acetone
• D – dichloromethane
• F – toluene
• G – diethylamine
• H – tetrahydrofuran
• I – ethyl acetate
• J – n-heptane
• K – 30% sodium hydroxide
• L – 95% sulphuric acid
• M – 65% nitric acid
• N – 99% acetic acid
• O– 25% ammonia solution
• P – 30% hydrogen peroxide solution
• Q – isopropanol
• R – 13% sodium hypochlorite

EN 15090

EN 15090:2012 – Footwear for firefighters

(EN 15090:2012 supersedes EN 15090:2006.)

EN 15090:2012 specifies the minimum requirements and test methods for the performance of three types of footwear used by firefighters for fire suppression, general-purpose rescue, fire rescue, and emergencies involving hazardous materials. This European standard does not cover the special personal protective equipment (PPE) used in high-risk situations.

Classification:

Description code Classification
I Footwear made from leather or other materials, excluding all rubber and all polymeric footwear
II Footwear made entirely of rubber or polymer

 

Footwear are classified as:
• Class I: footwear made from leather and other materials, excluding all-rubber or all-polymeric footwear
• Class II: all rubber (i.e. entirely vulcanized), all polymeric (manufactured in one piece), and hybrid footwear (polymeric) footwear with another material that extends the upper 

The three types of footwear for firefighters are as follows:

Type 1   Suitable for general-purpose rescue, fire suppression, and firefighting suppression action involving a fire in vegetative fuels such as forests, crops, grass, and farmland; no protection against penetration, no toe protection, and no protection against chemical hazards (these properties however can be present as optional).

Type 2   Suitable for fire rescue, fire suppression, and property conservation in buildings, enclosed structures, vehicles, vessels, or like properties that are involved in a fire or emergency situation; all fire suppression and rescue interventions where toe protection and protection against penetration are needed; no protection against chemical hazards.

Type 3 Emergencies involving hazardous materials, those involving the release or potential release of hazardous chemicals into the environment that can cause loss of life, personnel injury, or damage to property and the environment; suitable also for fire rescue, fire suppression, and property conservation in aircraft, buildings, enclosed structures, vehicles, vessels, or like properties that are involved in a fire or emergency situation; all fire suppression and rescue interventions where toe protection, protection against penetration, and protection against chemical hazards are needed.

  

Symbols marked on the footwear denote the following features:

Footwear type Symbol Properties
Type 1 F1A All normative requirements and the requirements for antistatic properties
  F1PA All normative requirements and the requirements for penetration resistance for antistatic properties
  F1I All normative requirements and the requirements for electrical insulting properties
Type 2 F1PI All normative requirements and the requirements for penetration resistance for electrical  insulting properties
  F2AI All normative requirements and the requirements for antistatic properties
  F2I All normative requirements and the requirements for electrical insulting properties
Type 3 F3A All normative requirements and the requirements for antistatic properties
  F3I All normative requirements and the requirements for electrical insulting properties

 

Additional symbols that may be marked on the footwear:

Marking/Symbol Requirements
HI1 Insulation against heat at 150°C/30 min
HI2 Insulation against heat at 250°C/20 min
HI3 Insulation against heat at 250°C/40 min
T Internal toe cap 200 J (marking only valid for Type 1 boots)
R Rigidity of the toe puff at 500 N (marking only valid for Type 1 boots)
P Penetration resistance
I Electrically insulating footwear
A Antistatic footwear
CI Insulation against cold
CH Chemical resistance
AN Ankle protection
M Metatarsal protection

 

Requirements for footwear resistant to slip (slips, trips and falls resistance:

Marking/Symbol Test Condition Mode
SRA Surface: ceramic
Lubricant: deteergent solution
Heel
Flat
SRB Surface: smooth steel
Lubricant: glycerol
Heel
Flat
SRC SRA + SRB  

EN 20344:2011 - Personal protective equipment (PPE) – Test methods for footwear

(EN 20344:2011 supersedes EN 20344:2004.)

This international standard describes methods for testing footwear designed for use as PPE.

The EN 20344 standard takes a more comprehensive approach than other standards, testing not only for the footwear’s principal safety features but the total performance of the footwear and its components.

The EN 20344 standard describes methods to test and assess the safety and protective capacities of occupational footwear. In addition, this standard also includes a description of methods for testing and assessing the comfort of footwear.

EN 20345:2011 - Personal protective equipment - Safety footwear

(EN 20345:2011 supersedes EN 20345:2007.)

This international standard details basic and additional (i.e., optional) requirements for general-purpose safety footwear (e.g., mechanical risks, slip resistance, thermal risks, and ergonomic design) and for footwear designed for specific professions and worksite conditions (e.g. footwear for firefighters, electrical insulating footwear, protection against chainsaw injuries, protection against chemicals and molten metal splash, protection for motorcyclists).

Safety footwear that complies with EN 20345 is fitted with toecaps to ensure protection against impact when tested at an energy level of at least 200 J and against compression when tested at a compression load of at least 15 kN. 

Footwear is classified according to the following classes:

• Class I: footwear made from leather and other materials, excluding all-rubber and all-polymeric footwear (S1, S2, and S3)
• Class II: all-rubber (i.e. entirely vulcanised), all-polymeric (manufactured in one piece), and hybrid (S4, S5, and SBH = polymeric footwear with another material that extends the upper) footwear

Marking categories for safety shoes:

Category Class Additional requirements
SB I or II Basic requirements for shoes and impact resistance of toecaps; toe protection against a 200 Joule impact.
SB-P   Same features as the SB rating withg the addition of the midsole penetration protection this can be a stainless steel insert in the sole, aluminum insert in the sole or by kevlar insole.
S1 I With protective toecap, closed heels, antistatic properties, energy absorption in heel region, fuel oil-resistant. Use in dry working conditions.
S1-P   Same as S1 plus penetration resistance
S2 I Same as S1 plus water penetration and water absorption (waterproof shaft up to 60 minutes). Use in humid/wet working conditions.
S3 I Same as S2 plus penetration resistance and cleated outsole.
S4 II Boots with protective toecap, antistatic properties, energy adsorption in heel region and liquid-tight.
S5 II Same as S4 plus penetration resistance and cleated outsole.
SBH II Same as S4 or S5

 

Additional requirements:

Symbol Requirement related to Description additional safety requirements
P Whole footwear Penetration resistance
C   Conductive footwear
A   Antistatic footwear
I   Electrically insulating footwear
HI   Heat insulation of sole complex (footwear with soles resistant to hot environmental conditions)
CI   Cold insulation of sole complex (footwear with
E   Energy absorption of seat region
WR   Water resistance
M   Metatarsal protection (requirement related only to safety and protective footwear)
AN   Ankle protection
CR   Cut resistance
WRU Upper Water penetration and water absorption
HRO Outsole Resistance to hot contact
FO   Resistance to fuel oil

 

Requirements for slip-resistant footwear (e.g., resistance to slips, trips and falls): 

Symbol Description additional safety requirements
SRA Slip resistance on ceramic tile flooring with NaLS solution (sodium lauryl sulfate)
SRB Slip resistance on steel flooring with glycerin
SRC Slip resistance on ceramic tile flooring with NaLS and steel flooring with glycerin

EN 20346:2014- Personal protective equipment (PPE): Protective footwear 

(EN 20346:2014 supersedes NEN-EN-ISO 20346:2004.)

This standard details basic and additional (i.e., optional) requirements for general-purpose protective footwear (e.g., mechanical risks, slip resistance, thermal risks, and ergonomic design) and for footwear designed for specific professions and worksite conditions (e.g. footwear for firefighters, electrical insulating footwear, protection against chainsaw injuries, protection against chemicals and molten metal splash, protection for motorcyclists).

Protective footwear that complies with EN 20346 is fitted with toecaps to ensure protection against impact when tested at an energy level of at least 100 J and against compression when tested at a compression load of at least 10 kN.

Footwear are classified according to the following classes:
• Class I – footwear made from leather and other materials, excluding all-rubber and all-polymeric footwear (P1, P2, and P3)
• Class II – all-rubber (i.e. entirely vulcanised), all-polymeric (manufactured in one piece), and hybrid (P4, P5, and PBH = polymeric footwear with another material that extends the upper) footwear 

Marking categories for occupational footwear:

Category Class Additional requirements
PB I or II Basic requirements for protective footwear; toe protection against a 100 Joule impact.
P1 I With protective toecap, closed heels, antistatic properties, energy absorption in heel region, fuel oil-resistant outsole. Use in dry working conditions.
P2 I Same as P1 plus water penetration and water absorption (waterproof shaft up to 60 minutes). Designed for use in humid/wet working conditions.
P3 I Same as P2 plus penetration resistance and cleated outsole.
P4 II Boots with basic requirements plus antistatic properties, energy absorption in heel region, and liquid-tight.
P5 II Same as P4 plus penetration resistance and cleated outsole.
PBH II Same as P4 or P5.

 

Additional requirements:

Symbol Requirement related to Description additional safety requirements
P Whole footwear Penetration resistance
C   Conductive footwear
A   Antistatic footwear
I   Electrically insulating footwear
HI   Heat insulation of sole complex (footwear with soles resistant to hot environmental conditions)
CI   Cold insulation of sole complex (footwear with soles resistant to cold environmental conditions)
E   Energy absorption of seat region
WR   Water resistance
M   Metatarsal protection (requirement related only to safety and protective footwear)
AN   Ankle protection
CR   Cut resistance
WRU Upper Water penetration and water absorption
HRO Outsole Resistance to hot contact
FO   Resistance to fuel oil.

 

Requirements for footwear resistant to slip (e.g., resistance to slips, trips and falls):

Symbol Description additional safety requirements
SRA Slip resistance on ceramic tile flooring with NaLS solution (sodium lauryl sulfate)
SRB Slip resistance on steel flooring with glycerin
SRC Slip resistance on ceramic tile flooring with NaLS and steel flooring with glycerin

EN 20347:2011 – Personal protective equipment (PPE): Occupational footwear

(EN 20347:2011 supersedes NEN-EN-ISO 20347:2004.)

This standard details basic and additional (i.e., optional) requirements for occupational footwear that will not be exposed to mechanical risks (e.g., impact or compression) and for footwear designed for specific professions and worksite conditions (e.g., footwear for firefighters, electrical insulating footwear, protection against chainsaw injuries, protection against chemicals and against molten metal splash, protection for motorcyclists).

Occupational footwear that complies with EN 20347 does not include toecaps that ensure protection against impact forces and compression loads. These types of footwear are designed for workplaces and activities in which both hazards to feet and toes are not identified during risk assessments.

Footwear is classified according to the following classes:
• Class I – footwear made from leather and other materials, excluding all-rubber and all-polymeric footwear (O1, O2, and O3)
• Class II – all-rubber (i.e. entirely vulcanised), all-polymeric (manufactured in one piece), and hybrid (O4, O5, and OBH = polymeric footwear with another material that extends the upper) footwear

Marking categories for occupational footwear:

Category Class Additional requirements
OB I or II Basic requirements for occupational footwear. No toe protection against mechanical hazards.
O1 I No toe protection against mechanical hazards. With closed heels, antistatic properties, energy absorption in heel region and fuel oil-resistant outsole. Use in dry working conditions.
O2 I Same as O1 plus water penetration and water absorption (waterproof shaft up to 60 minutes). For use in humid/wet working conditions.
O3 I Same as O2 plus penetration resistance and cleated outsole.
O4 II Boots with basic requirements plus antistatic properties, energy absorption in heel region and liquid-tight.
O5 II Same as O4 plus penetration resistance and cleated outsole.
OBH II Same as O4 and O5.

 

Additional requirements:

Symbol Requirement related to Description additional safety requirements
P Whole footwear Penetration resistance
C   Conductive footwear
A   Antistatic footwear
I   Electrically insulating footwear
HI   Heat insulation of sole complex (footwear with soles resistant to hot environmental conditions).
CI   Cold insulation of sole complex (footwear with soles resistant to cold environmental conditions)
E   Energy absorption of seat region
WR   Water resistance
AN   Ankle protection
CR   Cut resistance
WRU Upper Water penetration and water absorption
HRO Outside Resistance to hot contact
ORO   Outsole resistant to fuel oil

 

Requirements for slip-resistant footwear (e.g. resistance to slip, trips, and falls):

Symbol Description additional safety requirements
SRA Slip resistance on ceramic tile flooring with NaLS solution (sodium lauryl sulfate)
SRB Slip resistance on steel flooring with glycerin
SRC Slip resistance on ceramic tile flooring with NaLS and steel flooring with glycerin
EN 50321

EN 50321:1999 - Footwear for electrical protection - Insulating footwear and overboots

EN 50321 pertains to the requirements and testing for electrically insulated footwear and for overboots used for work on live circuits with voltages up to 36,000V AC.  The products designed and manufactured according to this standard contribute to the wearer’s safety provided the products are used as intended and in accordance with applicable guidelines. Footwear that is antistatic, shock-resistant, and conductive is not covered by this standard. This standard applies to the following designs: low shoes, ankle boots, half-knee boots, and knee-high boots.

 EN 50321:1999 has two classes:

Electrical Class Max. nominal AC voltage Max. nominal DC voltage
00 500 V 750 V
0 1.000 V 1.500 V
ASTM F2413-11

ASTM F2413-11: Standard specification for performance requirements for protective (safety) toecap footwear.

ASTM F2413-11 Standard specification for performance requirements for protective (safety) toecap footwear replaces the former ANSI Z41 standard, which was withdrawn in 2005. This specification covers the minimum design, performance, testing, and classification requirements, and prescribes fit, function, and performance criteria for footwear designed to protect against a variety of workplace hazards. It is not the intention of this specification to serve as a detailed manufacturing or purchasing specification. Instead, this specification can be referenced in purchase contracts to ensure that minimum performance requirements are met. Footwear conforming to this specification must meet the performance requirements for the following: impact resistance for the toe area; compression resistance for the toe area; metatarsal protection that reduces the chance of injury to the metatarsal bones at the top of the foot; conductive properties that reduce hazards resulting from static electricity build-up and reduce the possibility of igniting explosives and volatile chemicals; electric shock resistance; static dissipative (SD) properties to reduce hazards caused by exceedingly low footwear resistance that may exist where SD footwear is required; puncture resistance of footwear bottoms; chainsaw cut resistance; and dielectric insulation. The purpose of this standard is to summarize the requirements for certifying protective footwear by independent, third party laboratories.
Footwear certified as meeting ASTM F2413-11 must first meet the requirements of Section 5.1: Impact Resistant Footwear and Section 5.2: Compression Resistant Footwear. Following these assessments, the requirements of additional sections—such as metatarsal protection, conductive protection, electric hazard resistance, static dissipative protection, and protection against punctures—can be met.
All footwear manufactured to the ASTM specification must be marked with the specific portion of the standard with which it complies. One shoe of each pair must be clearly and legibly marked (e.g., stitched in, stamped on, pressure sensitive label, etc.) on either the surface of the tongue, gusset, shaft, or quarter lining. The marking must be enclosed in a rectangular border; a four-line format is recommended. Line four is used only when more than three sections of the standard apply to the footwear.
Each protective toecap must be marked with the manufacturer’s name and trademark or logo. The cap number or identification, toecap size, and R (right)/L (left) designation must be permanently stamped or marked in a conspicuous location. Each metatarsal and puncture-resistant device must be marked with the manufacturer’s name, trademark or logo, and device number or identification in a conspicuous location.
The following is an example of an ASTM F2413-11 marking on protective footwear:

• ASTM F2413-11
• M I/75/C/75
• PR/Mt75

Line 1: ASTM F2413-11
This line identifies the ASTM standard. It indicates that the protective footwear meets the performance requirements of ASTM F2413, issued in 2011.

Line 2: M I/75 C/75
This line identifies the applicable gender [M (Male) or F (Female)] for which the footwear is intended. It also identifies the existence of impact resistance (I), the impact resistance rating (75, 50 or 30 foot-pounds), compression resistance (C), and the compression resistance rating (75, 50, or 30, which correlate to 2500 pounds, 1750 pounds, and 1000 pounds of compression respectively).

Line 3: PR Mt75
Line 3 is used to identify footwear made to protect against the specific hazards described in the standard Cd, EH, SD, PR, Mt. These are used to designate conductive (Cd) properties, electrical hazard resistance properties (EH), footwear designed to reduce the accumulation of excess static electricity (SD), and puncture resistance (PR). The metatarsal designation (Mt) and rating (i.e., 75 foot-pounds) is also identified.

Conductive (Cd) footwear is intended to provide protection for the wearer against hazards resulting from static electricity build-up and to reduce the possibility of igniting explosives and volatile chemicals. The footwear must facilitate electrical conductivity and the transfer of static electricity build-up from the wearer to the ground. The electrical resistance must range between zero and 500,000 ohms.

Electrical hazard (EH) footwear is manufactured with non-conductive, electrical shock-resistant soles and heels. The outsole is intended to provide a secondary source of electric shock-resistance protection for the wearer against the hazards associated with incidental contact with live electrical circuits, electrically-energized conductors, parts, or apparatuses. It must be capable of withstanding the application of 18,000 volts at 60 hertz for one minute with no current flow or leakage current in excess of one milliampere under dry conditions.
Static dissipative (SD) footwear is designed to provide protection against hazards associated with exceedingly low footwear resistance and to maintain a sufficiently high level of resistance to reduce the possibility of electric shock. The footwear must have a lower limit of electrical resistance of 106 ohms and an upper limit of 108 ohms.

Puncture-resistant (PR) footwear features a puncture-resistant plate positioned between the insole and outsole. This plate is an integral and permanent part of the footwear. Devices constructed of metal must pass the ASTM B117-11 Standard Practice for Operating Salt Spray (Fog Apparatus) corrosion resistance testing. The device must show no sign of corrosion after being exposed to a five percent salt solution for 24 hours. The puncture-resistant footwear must show no signs of cracking after being subjected to 1.5 million flexes and have a minimum puncture resistance of 270 pounds.

Metatarsal protection (Mt) footwear is designed to prevent or reduce injuries when the toe and metatarsal areas of the foot are exposed to “drop” hazards.
Any changes to the original components of safety toe footwear, such as replacing or adding foot beds or inserts, could cause failure to any or all parts of the ASTM standard invalidates the safety marking.

EN 136:1998 - Respiratory protective devices - Full face masks

This standard specifies the minimum requirements for full face mask respiratory protective devices. Full face masks for diving apparatuses are not included in the scope of this standard. Laboratory and practical performance tests are included in these requirements' compliance assessments. A mask is a full face piece that covers the eyes, nose, mouth, and chin and that provides the wearer with respiratory protection in the form of an appropriate seal against specific atmospheric conditions and airborne hazards. Respirators and masks are manufactured in natural rubber, EPDM, and silicone and are available in designs and with filters that conform to a variety of safety standards (e.g., EN 141, EN 143, and EN 371).

This standard covers three types of full-face masks, all provide the same level of respiratory protection but have differences in terms of their applications:

• CL 1: Full mask for light duty
• CL 2: Full mask general use
• CL 3: Full mask for special use

Requirements include temperature stability, impermeability, and concentration of carbon monoxide, breathing resistance, speech diaphragms, and field of vision.

Requirements:

• Materials
• Resistance to temperature
• Inflammability
• Resistance to thermal radiation
• Finished pieces
• Replaceable components
• Headband
• Connectors
• Speech diaphragm
• Eye and viewers
• Inhalation valves and exhalation valves
• Air tightness
• Skin compatibility
• Carbon dioxide content in the air inhaled
• Breathing resistance
• Inward leakage
• Field of View

Marking package:

• Manufacturer
• Type and Class
• Standard
• CE marking
• Reference to user instructions
• Size notation (if more sizes are available)
• Country of origin

Marking on face mask:

• Manufacturer
• Type and Class
• Standard
• CE marking
• Size notation (if more sizes are available)
• Country of origin
• Production year (clock notation)
• The marking signs need to be clear and durable

EN 140 - Respiratory protective devices - Half masks and quarter masks

This standard specifies the minimum requirements for half- and quarter masks for use as part of respiratory protective devices. Requirements include testing inward leakage, breathability, flammability, and the mechanical tightness of valves and connections. These facepieces can be used in negative pressure isolation chambers and powered or supplied air systems. If used in a negative pressure isolation chamber, the mask should have filters conforming to EN 141, EN 143, EN 371 or EN 372 attached to it. Please note that the requirements of this standard do not apply to escape- and diving apparatuses.

Half or quarter masks: masks that cover the nose, mouth, and chin or the nose and mouth only. The facepiece is generally made of flexible rubber or silicone and can be fitted with a range of replaceable filters that conform with the requirements specified in EN 141, EN 143, EN 371, and EN 372. Since heavy filters are uncomfortable and compromise the strength and protective capacities of face seals, the maximum weight of filters that are to be fitted to half masks is 300g. Half masks should be fitted in accordance with the EN 148/1 standard specifying thread fitting.

EN 143 - Respiratory protective devices - Particle filters

EN 143:2000 Corrected 2002, 2006, Amended 2006

This standard pertains to the particle filters used as components in unassisted respiratory protective devices. The standard describes the laboratory tests used to assess the filters' compliance with the standard's requirements and the filters' suitability for use with other respiratory protective devices. Filtering face pieces and filters used in escape apparatuses are excluded from the scope of this standard.

Based on their efficiency, particle filters are divided into three categories:

• P1 – low filtration, intended for use against solid particles only
• P2 – medium filtration, subdivided according to the filters' capacity to remove both solid and liquid particles or solid particles only
• P3 – high filtration, subdivided according to the filters' capacity to remove both solid and liquid particles or solid particles only

Class Maximum filter penetration of test aerosol (%) Maximum breathing resistance (mbar*)
  Sodium chloride test at 95 l/min Paraffin oil test at 95 l/min at 30 l/min at 95 l/min
P1 20% 20% 0,6 2,1
P2 6% 6% 0,7 2,4
P3 0,05% 0,05% 1,2 4,2

* 1 bar = 105 N/m2 = 100 kPa

Markings:
• P + particle category
• R (= reusable), or NR (= not reusable /single shift)
• CE marking with approval number of notified body
• Color code: white

Additional markings:
• whether the filter is intended for use in a multi-filter device
• indication (+ expired hourglass symbol) of filter's expiration date, formatted as "yyyy/mm"

EN 148-1 - Respiratory protective devices - Threads for facepieces - Part 1: Standard thread connection

This European Standard is applicable to standard threads for respiratory protective devices. This standard describes the different connection types between the PPE and filters in regards to the masks. The most common standard is EN 148-1 which is described by thread Rd40 x 1/7”. This standard does not apply to diving equipment and to positive pressure breathing apparatus.

EN 149 - Respiratory protective devices - Filtering half masks to protect against particles - Requirements, testing, marking

This European Standard specifies the minimum requirements for filtering half masks used as respiratory protective devices, specifically against particles, and the required laboratory and practical performance tests to assess masks’ compliance. Half masks used for escape purposes are excluded from the scope of this standard.

A filtering half mask is one in which the facepiece consists entirely or substantially of filter material or comprises a facepiece in which the main filter(s) form an inseparable part of the device.
Under the preceding EN149:1991 standard, the classifications were FFP1S, FFP2S, FFP2SL, FFP3S and FFP3SL. EN149:2001 classified half masks into three types according to their filtering capacities (e.g., FFP1, FFP2, and FFP3). Respirators that meet the requirements of EN149:2001 are designed to protect against solids, water-based aerosols, and oil-based aerosols.
EN149:2001 differs from EN149:1991 in that it is mandatory for all products tested in accordance with EN149:2001 to provide protection against solid and liquid aerosols whereas EN149:1991 allows for the testing of respirators against solid aerosols only. On 1 August 1 2010, an amendment to EN 149.2001 standard entered into force concerning the reusability of masks’ dust filters, indicated by “R”, reusable, and “NR”, non reusable, and tagged as EN 149:2001+A1:2009.

EN 149 defines the following classes of filtering half masks (i.e., respirators that are entirely or substantially constructed of filtering material):
Class APF (Assigned Protection factor) Filter penetration limit (at 95 L/min air flow) Inward leakage

Class APF (Assigned Protection factor) Filter penetration limit (at 95 L/min air flow) Inward leakage
FFP1 4 Filters at least 80% of airborne particles <22%
FFP2 10 Filters at least 94% of airborne particles <8%
FFP3 20 Filters at least 98% of airborne particles <2%

 

To confirm: an FFP3 respirator mask would filter out at least 98% of the airborne respirable particles, whereas an FFP1 respirator mask would filter out at least 80% of the respirable particles. FFP3 respirator masks are, therefore, the most efficient in filtering out fine particles including viruses, mold spores, and asbestos.

EN 166:2001 - Personal eye protection - Specifications 

This standard specifies the functional requirements for various types of personal eye protectors, incorporates general considerations concerning designation, classification, universal requirements for eye protection, testing and application, and safety marking, and describes how both frames and lenses are to be tested.

EN 166 is the core technical standard that all PPE used to protect the eyes or face must be approved in accordance with. Depending on equipment’s intended use, protection requirements may differ.

Marking on lens/oculars must include:
• The scale number for filtering lenses/radiation protection:
2 - UV Protection (EN 170): “2” indicates that the filter may affect colour recognition.
2C or 3 - UV Protection (EN 170): “2C” (previously “3”) indicates that the filter allows good colour recognition.
4 – Infrared (IR) Protection (EN 171): protection from heat.
5 - Solar Protection (EN 172): 100% UV sun glare protection with no IR protection.
6 - Solar Protection (EN 172): 100% UV sun glare protection with IR protection.
• The manufacturer's name (note: logo or brand recommended by the manufacturer).
• Optical class symbols, ranked according to effectiveness:
Class 1 – Continuous work: suitable for occasional wear (refractive power of ± 0.06 dioptres).
Class 2 – Intermittent work: suitable for occasional wear (refractive power of ± 0.12 dioptres).
Class 3 – Occasional work: suitable for exceptional wear (refractive power of ± 0.25 dioptres).
• Field(s) of use symbols:
3 - Liquids droplets (goggles) or liquid splashes (face shields, but not those made of mesh)
4 - Large dust particles (i.e., particles size >5μm)
5 - Gases and fine dust particles (e.g., particle size <5μm)
8 - Protection against short circuit/electric arc
9 - Molten metal and hot solids
• Optional requirements:
K - Hard coat: resistance to surface damage by fine particles (optional); anti-scratch protection
N - Non-mist: resistance to misting/fogging (optional)
R - Enhanced reflectance (optional)
G - Radiant heat: mesh-type protection only
H - Eye protector designed to fit small-sized heads/faces
• Mechanical strength symbols:
None - without mechanical strength (i.e., filters only)
S - Extra strong: resists a 22 mm, 43 g ball falling 1.30 m at 5.1 m/s (oculars only)
F - Low energy impact: resists a 6 mm, 0.86 g ball falling 1.30 m at 45 m/s (any type)
B - Medium energy impact: resists a 6 mm, 0.86 g ball falling 1.30 m at 120 m/s (goggles and face shields only)
A - High-energy impact: resists a 6 mm, 0.86 g ball falling 1.30 m at 190 m/s (face shields only)
T - The letter T: indicates protection against high-speed particles heated to extreme temperatures if written following a mechanical strength symbol (e.g., F, B or A).
• Certification mark (CE)
Note: a combination of the symbols and numbers mentioned above is possible.

Marking on the frame must include:
• The manufacturer's name (logo or brand recommended by the manufacturer)
• Number of the EN Standard
• Field(s) of use symbols:
3 - Liquids droplets (goggles) or liquid splashes (face shields, but not those made of mesh)
4 - Large dust particles (i.e., particles size >5μm)
5 - Gases and fine dust particles (e.g., particle size <5μm)
8 - Protection against short circuit/electric Arc (face shields only)
9 - Molten metal and hot solids (note: goggles and face shields only)
• Optional requirements:
K - Hard coat: resistance to surface damage by fine particles (optional); anti-scratch protection
N - Non-mist: resistance to misting/fogging (optional)
R - Enhanced reflectance (optional)
G - Radiant heat: mesh-type protection only
H - Eye protector designed to fit small-sized heads/faces
• Mechanical strength symbols:
None - without mechanical strength (i.e., filters only)
S - Extra strong: resists a 22 mm, 43 g ball falling 1.30 m at 5.1 m/s (oculars only)
F - Low energy impact: resists a 6 mm, 0.86 g ball falling 1.30 m at 45 m/s (any type)
B - Medium energy impact: resists a 6 mm, 0.86 g ball falling 1.30 m at 120 m/s (goggles and face shields only)
A - High-energy impact: resists a 6 mm, 0.86 g ball falling 1.30 m at 190 m/s (face shields only)
T - The letter T: indicates protection against high-speed particles heated to extreme temperatures if written following a mechanical strength symbol (e.g., F, B or A).
• Certification mark (CE)
Note: a combination of the symbols and numbers mentioned above is possible. 

Scale Number - for lenses with filtering effect only.
The scale number is a code number and a shade number separated by a hyphen (note: welding filters have no code number). Higher shade numbers indicate a stronger filtering effect (e.g. they are darker for welding). Example: an IR filter with shade number 4 has the scale number 4-4.

 

Welding filters (See EN 169 and EN 379) No code number; shade number between 1.2 and 16; suffix denotes filter for use in gas welding with flux
UV filters (See EN 170) 2C- or 3- - code number denoting UV filter without or with good colour recognition, respectively; shade number between 1.2 and 5
IR filters (Infra-red) (See EN 171) 4- - code number for IR filters; shade number between 1.2 and 10
Sun glare (See EN 172 and EN 1836) 5- code number for sun glare filters without IR specification; shade number between 1.1 and 4.1
Sun glare (See EN 172 and EN 1836) 6- - code number for sun glare filters with IR specification; shade number between 1.1 and 4.1

 

Shade number Typical lens colour VLT range
1.2 Clear 100% - 74.4%
1.7 In/Out, yellow, clear mirrored, UVR 58.1% - 43.2%
2.5 Brown, smoke 29.1% - 17.8%
3.1 G15, smoke mirrored 17.8% - 8.0%
3,4,5,...11 Welding -

EN 169 Personal eye protection - Filters for welding and related applications - Transmittance requirements and recommended use 

This standard specifies the scale numbers and transmittance requirements for filters intended to protect operators performing work involving welding, braze-welding, air-arc gouging, and plasma jet cutting. It also includes requirements for welding filters with dual scale numbers. The other applicable requirements for these types of filters are detailed in EN 166. The requirements for fitting frames and mountings are described in Annex EN 175. 

The numbering table for filters and the reference for marking oculars and frames are available in EN 166.

EN 170:2002 Personal eye protection - Ultraviolet filters - Transmittance requirements and recommended use

 This European Standard specifies the scale numbers and transmittance requirements for filters that protect against ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Other applicable requirements for these types of filters, along with the frames and mountings to which these filters are affixed, are available in EN 166. Guidance concerning the selection and use of these filters is available in Annex B.

Note: the protective filters that serve as examples in this standard are not suitable for the direct viewing of bright light (e.g., from sources such as Xenon high-pressure arc lamps) nor are they suitable for the direct and indirect observation of an electric welding arc. 

The numbering table for filters and the reference for marking oculars and frames are available in EN 166.

EN 172:1995 Personal eye protection - Sunlight filters for industrial use 

This standard specifies the scale numbers, transmittances, and related requirements for sun glare filters designed for industrial use. Other requirements for these types of filters are specified in EN 166. Section criteria and information pertaining to the use of these filters are available in Annex A. This standard does not apply to filters that protect against radiation from artificial sources, such as those used in solaria, nor does it apply to ski goggles. To confirm: a separate standard is forthcoming for sunglasses and sun glare filters intended for general use.

The numbering table for filters and the reference for marking oculars and frames are available in EN 166.

EN 175 Personal Protection - Equipment providing eye and face protection for welding and related processes

This standard specifies the safety requirements and test methods for personal protective equipment (PPE) that protects the wearer's eyes and face against harmful optical radiation and other specific risks and hazards associated with welding, cutting, or similar operations (e.g., ergonomic, fire, mechanical, and electrical). The resulting equipment is designed to incorporate protective filters, with or without cover/backing oculars, as recommended by the welding protector manufacturer and in accordance with EN 166:1995 and in compliance with EN 169:1992 or EN 379:1994.

Hoods, inspector face screens, laser protective equipment, and welding protection for special applications, are beyond the scope of this standard.

Additionally, this standard defines the terms used and specifies requirements for product designs, materials, and manufacturing processes.

The numbering table for filters and the reference for marking oculars and frames are available in EN 166.

EN 352: Hearing protection - General requirements

EN 352 The European Standard for protection against noise is made in several parts for the safety and testing on different types of individual noise protectors.
The different types can be identified using the extension following EN 352, for example: EN 352-1.

● EN 352-1 for Ear Muffs
● EN 352-2 for Ear Plugs and Ear Moulds
● EN 352-3 for Helmet Mounted Ear Muffs
● EN 352-4 for Level Dependent Ear Muffs
● EN 352-5 for Active Noise Reduction Ear Muffs
● EN 352-6 for Ear Muffs with Electrical Audio Inputs
● EN352-7 for Level Dependent Ear Plugs

Definitions:
Ear defenders or ear muffs: PPE designed to protect the wearer from extreme noise. The head-band and outer covering is usually made from hard thermoplastic or metal, and the protection is from acoustic foam which absorbs sound waves by increasing air resistance, thus reducing the amplitude of the waves.
dB (A): Decibels. Main unit used for the power level or intensity level of the sound. The daily exposure of a worker to the noise, daily level of equivalence, is expressed in dB (A), calculated and referred to 8 hours a day. Because the human ear can register sounds across an extensive range of intensity, a linear scale is not suitable for measurement. The dB scale is therefore a log scale in which the sound intensity roughly doubles for every 3 dB increase. An increase of 20 dB would increase the sound intensity 100 times, (i.e., 60 dB is 100 times louder than 40 dB).
Peak acoustic pressure: A measure of the maximum instantaneous sound pressure at a specified location. Exposure to high peak sound levels can be associated with immediate damage to hearing.
Daily exposure level to the noise (LEX, 8h) (dB (A), ref 20 μPa): is the sound exposure averaged over 8 hours. •the levels of exposure to noise of employees averaged over a working day or week; and
•the maximum noise (peak sound pressure) to which employees are exposed in a working day.
SNR “Simplified Noise level Reduction” or “Single Number Rating”: Is an ear defender average sound noise reduction. It is generally used to compare different types of hearing protectors. The higher the SNR, the higher the level of noise attenuation provided by the hearing protection.
HML is “High, Medium and Low” and defines the protection at high, medium and low frequencies.

Important limits within the law:
• Noise 80 dB(A) – Noise level preferably lie between 70 -80 dB.
• Noise 85 dB(A) - Hearing protection is required.
• Noise 87 dB(A) - This limit may not be exceeded.

Actions to be taken per limit:
Sound level 80 dB(A)
• Determine the degree of risk of exposure to the sound
• Take measures to reduce exposure
• Inform staff about the risks
• Ensure that proper training and information is provided about the risks and measures
• Audiometric testing is required if the risks may endanger health

Sound level 85 dB(A)
• Determine the degree of risk of exposure to the sound
• Take measures to reduce exposure
• Inform staff about the risks
• Ensure that proper training and information is provided about the risks and measures
• Hearing protection is required
• Audiometric testing is a requirement

Sound level 87 dB(A)
• This threshold value must not be exceeded under any conditions
• All sound measurements are carried out inside the ear; in other words, the level of 87 dB(A) must not be exceeded if hearing protection is already being worn

How long can you be exposed to a specified level of sound?

Sound Pressure in dB(A) Safe length of exposure
80dB(A) 8 hours
83dB(A) 4 hours
86dB(A) 2 hours
89dB(A) 1 hours
92dB(A) 30 minutes
95dB(A) 15 minutes
98dB(A) 7 minutes and 30 seconds
101dB(A) 3 minutes and 45 seconds
104dB(A) 2 minutes
107dB(A) 1 minute

EN 352-1: Hearing protection - General requirements - Part 1: Ear-muffs 

EN 352-1: 2002 specifies requirements for materials and construction, design, performance, marking and user information for ear-muffs. It specifies the sound attenuation of the ear-muffs, measured in accordance with EN 24869-1. Ergonomic aspects are addressed by taking into account, within the requirements, the interaction between the wearer, the device and where possible the working environment in which the device is likely to be used. 

For industrial applications, the Control of Noise at Work Regulations 2005 came into force in 2006 which reduced the starting point for ear protection from 85 dB to 80 dB. Workers must be informed and provided with training when noise levels reach 80 dB (was 85 dB) and protection should be made available. Protection must be provided by the employer when sound levels reach 85 dB or above. 

Marking ear muffs:
• Manufacturer/company name
• Identification or model number
• Number and date of the standard
• When required- e.g. “Top “and/or “Left “and “Right”

EN 352-2:2002 - Hearing protection - Ear plugs

EN 352-2:2002 specifies constructional, design and performance requirements, marking requirements and user information for ear-plugs. It specifies the sound attenuation of the ear-plugs, measured in accordance with EN 24869-1. Ergonomic aspects are addressed by taking into account, within the requirements, the interaction between the wearer, the device and where possible the working environment in which the device is likely to be used.

Markings may only appear on the packaging. In addition to the Standard number, manufacturer and model identification:
• Whether disposable or re-useable
• Fitting instructions
• Nominal size of formable plugs, in range 5 to 14 mm.
• Left-right differentiation for custom moulded plugs

EN 352-3:2002 - Hearing protection - General requirements - Part 3: Ear-muffs attached to an industrial safety helmet

EN 352-3:2002, this part of the standard specifies requirements for construction, design, performance, marking, and user information for ear-muffs fitted to an industrial helmet which complies with EN 397. It specifies the sound attenuation of the helmet mounted ear-muffs, measured in accordance with EN 24869-1. Because one model of ear-muffs designed to be attached to an industrial safety helmet can be fitted to a number of helmet models and sizes, this part of the standard sets out a series of physical and acoustic requirements for the ear-muffs when fitted to the specified model(s) or size(s) of helmet. All requirements apply to the ear-muffs fitted to one of the specified models or sizes of helmet (the basic combination), and an abbreviated set of requirements apply to the same model of ear-muffs when fitted to the other specified models or sizes of helmet (the supplementary combinations). Information on the range models of helmet tested with the ear-muffs, and for which the combination satisfied this standard, is required to be made available. Ergonomic aspects are addressed by taking into account within the requirements: the interaction between the wearer, the device, and whenever possible, the working environment in which the device is likely to be used.

Marking ear muffs:
• Manufacturer/company name
• Identification or model number
• Number and date of the standard
• When required- e.g. “Top “and/or “Left “and “Right”

EN 353-1 Personal protection against falls – Part 1: Guided type fall arresters with rigid anchor lines 

EN 353-1:2002 specifies the requirements, test methods, marking, manufacturer information, and packaging for guided type fall arresters that include rigid anchor lines (i.e., those commonly attached to or integrated in fixed ladders or on rungs that are adequately adjusted to suitable structures). Guided type fall arresters with rigid anchor lines that conform with this European standard are sub-systems constituting one of the fall arrest systems covered by EN 363 only when combined with a full body harness that includes a front attachment point located in proper relation to the fall arrester (see EN 361). Other types of fall arresters are described in EN 353-2 and EN 360. Energy absorbers are detailed in EN 355.

This standard has been withdrawn due to the occurrence of fall protection accidents for which proper reporting concerning causes is unavailable. Even as fall arresters meet the applicable safety standard (i.e., EN 353-1), it has not been possible to prevent these accidents. The withdrawal of EN 353-1:2002 indicates that meeting the requirements specified in EN 353-1:2002 does not establish sufficient protection. 

EN 353-1:2014 supersedes BS EN 353-1: 2002. Annex B (informative) lists the significant technical changes between the new and preceding versions of the standard.

EN 353-1:2014 specifies the requirements, test methods, marking, manufacturer information, and packaging for guided type fall arresters that include rigid anchor lines (i.e., those commonly attached to or integrated in fixed ladders or on rungs that are adequately adjusted to suitable structures). Guided type fall arresters with rigid anchor lines that conform with this European standard are sub-systems constituting one of the fall arrest systems covered by EN 363 only when combined with a full body harness that includes a front attachment point located in proper relation to the fall arrester (see EN 361). This European standard applies to rigid anchor lines installed vertically and/or with a combination of a forward-leaning angle and/or a lateral angle between the true vertical and the vertical +15°. Multi-user applications (i.e. rigid anchor lines that allow more than one user to be attached at any one time) are not addressed in this document. 

Summary of key changes:
Angled systems:
Previously, the standard covered only systems in the vertical position. The revised standard covers systems between the vertical and the vertical +15°.

Minimum and maximum loads:
Guided type fall arresters must now be tested with both a minimum and maximum loads and should be marked accordingly. Previously, the standard required testing with a load of 100 kg.

Permanent attachment:
Connecting elements are now required to be permanently attached to the guided type fall arrester.

User intervention:
When attached to the rigid anchor, guided type fall arresters are must accompany the user upward and downward without manual intervention.

U-bolt clamps:
Top terminations to the rigid anchor lines using U-bolt clamps are no longer acceptable.

Functionality:
By outlining tests that must be undertaken, the standard now places greater emphasis on the functionality of the rigid anchor line and the guided type fall arresters. These function tests measure performance in low temperatures, at minimum distances, during fall backs, when affixed to a guiding bracket, during sideways falls, and the strength of sideways-leaning anchors.

EN 353-2:2002 Personal protection against falls – Part 2: Guided type fall arresters with flexible anchor lines

EN 353-2:2002 specifies the requirements, test methods, marking, manufacturer information, and packaging for guided type fall arresters that include flexible anchor lines (e.g., those that can be secured to an upper anchor point). Guided type fall arresters with include flexible anchor lines in conformance with this European standard are subsystems constituting one of the fall arrest systems covered by EN 363. Other types of fall arresters are described in EN 353-1 or EN 360. Energy absorbers are detailed in EN 355. 

EN 353-2

Guided type fall arresters (flexible lines)
These are systems comprised of a fixed line, either temporary or permanent, on which a travelling device is attached. The user connects to this travelling device when climbing or descending. In the event of a fall, the travelling device should grip the line and stop the fall. 

Dynamic Performance
Guided type fall arresters are subject to a drop test using a 100 kg mass, released over the maximum distance the device will allow (e.g., by raising the mass until the travelling device begins to slide up the cable or rail). The device should not deploy more—by movement of the travelling device, stretching the rope, or through deployment of energy absorbing elements—than 1 meter and with a maximum arrest force of 6 kN. 

Locking after Conditioning
With mechanical devices, additional testing is required to ensure they are not adversely affected by environmental conditions. Devices’ locking function can be tested with a mass of at least 5 kg after the devices have been exposed to 50°C with 85% relative humidity for at least 2 hours, to -30°C for at least 2 hours, and to water sprayed in volumes of 70 liters/per hour for at least 3 hours. Optional testing would follow devices’ submersion in diesel oil or dust.

Static Strength
Whole products are subjected to tensile tests. Textile lanyards are subject to a 15 kN tensile force and metal lanyards to 12 kN. Tensile forces are applied and held for at least 3 minutes to ensure that the products’ breaking strengths of the products exceed the force specified by the standard. 

Corrosion Resistance
Metallic components used in fall protection equipment are subjected to a neutral salt spray test designed to determine products’ capacity to resist environmental corrosion and rusting. Products are exposed to saltwater mist for 24 hours inside a sealed chamber. Following this exposure, products are examined for signs of rusting and diminished functionality.

EN 354 Personal fall protection equipment - Lanyards 

EN 354:2010 supersedes EN 354:2002 and specifies the requirements, test methods, marking, manufacturer information, and packaging for lanyards. Lanyards conforming to this European standard are used as connectors and components in personal fall protection systems (e.g., restraint systems, work positioning systems, rope access systems, fall arrest systems, and rescue systems). 

Lanyards are a standard component in the fall protection systems for those working at height, with a variety of designs, lengths, materials, and configurations. Since lanyards are exposed to intense wear and tear during use, rigorous testing of their protective capacities is imperative. This updated standard increases the amount of testing required to ensure that CE-marked lanyards provide appropriate protection against these worksite hazards.

Summary of key changes:
Design
The requirement in EN 354:2002 that lanyards measure 2m (at maximum) has been eliminated, meaning lanyards longer than 2m now fall under the scope of this standard. The only design requirement is that lanyards must be marked with their lengths (±5%).

Testing conditions
Specific conditioning requirements have been added. Test samples must be conditioned at 23oC (±5oC) and 65% (±5%) relative humidity (rh) for at least 24 hours prior to testing.

Additionally, “wet and cold” and “very cold” conditions have been added. Lanyards tested in accordance with EN 354:2010 must be subjected to “wet and cold” conditions; subjecting lanyards to the “very cold” condition is optional but recommended for lanyards intended for use in temperatures to as low as -30oC.

Slippage
EN 354:2010 includes an adjustable lanyard slippage test (see the related test in EN 358:1999). To pass this test, the adjustment device must not slip more than 50mm. The assignation of a “very cold” performance rating requires that the slippage test be repeated after the test samples have been subjected to “very cold” conditioning.

Static strength
The standard retains the 2002 edition’s 22kN static strength requirement for textile. Lanyards constructed entirely from metal are subjected to a 15kN static strength test, as they are more resilient to wear and tear. Test methods for twin-tail lanyards are now included. Any multi-leg lanyard must be tested in all possible configurations and to a force of either 22kN (textile) or 15kN (metal). Each configuration should be tested in relevant conditions.

Dynamic
Lanyards that include a length adjustment device must be subjected to a dynamic strength test. This test differs from previous tests for adjustable lanyards. A 100kg test mass must be attached to the test sample through a standard 2m lanyard. The mass is raised 2m above the attachment point, creating a free-fall distance of 4m. To pass this test, the lanyard must prevent the test mass from touching the ground. Note: measuring the forces generated is not required.

Following the dynamic test, the adjustment device must be subjected to a 3kN static strength test to determine the lanyard’s residual strength. If the lanyard can withstand this force for 3 minutes after the mass is dropped, the lanyard will have met the standard’s requirements.

Corrosion
Metallic components’ susceptibility to corrosion is now assessed following a 48-hour exposure time (note: in the preceding standard, the exposure time was 24 hours). Increased exposure to the neutral salt spray can lead to the failure of metallic components used in products that were tested against the 24-hour exposure time requirement. It is likely that a lengthier exposure time will result in the use of stronger coatings on lanyards’ metal components.

Product marking
Product markings must indicate the lanyard’s length and its date of manufacture. Information regarding the pictogram, model/type, and marking has been moved to EN 365.

EN 355: Personal protective equipment against falls from a height - Energy absorbers 

EN 355:2002 describes the requirements, test methods, marking, manufacturer information, and packaging specifications for energy absorbers. Energy absorbers in conformance with this European Standard are components of, or used in combination with, lanyards, anchor lines, and full body harnesses. The combination of an energy absorber and a lanyard constitutes one of the fall arrest systems detailed in EN 363 and, when combined with a full body harness, among those systems described in EN 361. In addition, EN 353-1, EN 353-2, and EN 360 pertain to fall arrest devices. 

If a user falls while connected to a 2m long textile lanyard without an energy absorber, the force on the user and the anchor would be unacceptably high. Therefore, every fall arrest system must be equipped with an energy absorber to limit the impact force to 6kN. 

EN 355:2002
Shock absorbing lanyards
Lanyards intended for use in connecting the attachment point of a full body harness to a secure anchorage device must include a shock-absorbing component that reduces the force applied to the wearer by gradually arresting their fall. In the event of a fall, shock absorbers should limit the impact force to a maximum of 6kN. 

Dynamic Performance
Shock absorbing lanyards are subject to a drop test to assess the lanyard’s capacity to arrest a fall within a maximum distance while limiting the arrest force to an acceptable range. The lanyard should not deploy (i.e., stretch, open, tear) beyond a maximum length of 1.75m, with a maximum force of 6 kN, when supporting a 100kg solid mass released over a distance that is twice the lanyard’s length. Energy absorbers that are sold separately (e.g., as components) must be extended with a chain to a length of 2m and tested using a mass released over a distance of 4m.

Static Strength
Energy absorbers are subjected to a 15 kN tensile force. Tensile forces are applied and held for at least 3 minutes to ensure that the product’s breaking strength exceeds the force specified in the standard.

Corrosion Resistance
Metallic components used in fall protection equipment are subjected to a neutral salt spray test to determine whether the product can provide a minimum resistance to environmental corrosion (e.g., rust). Products are held in a sealed chamber filled with a saltwater mist, which can cause untreated metals to rust. Products are subjected to either 24 or 48 hours of exposure and examined thereafter for signs of rust and to assess whether each device can continue to function properly.

EN 358: Personal protective equipment for work positioning and prevention of falls from a height - Belts and lanyards for work positioning and restraint

EN 358:2015 supersedes EN 358:2000 and applies to belts and lanyards designed for work positioning and restraint. It specifies the requirements, testing, marking, manufacturer information, and packaging specifications that must be supplied by manufacturers. The standard does not pertain to restraint lanyards with fixed lengths integrated into belts.

The waist strap must be no less than 43 mm wide and the back support no less than 100 mm wide. Lanyards can be equipped with adjustable shoulder and sitting straps but, for normal use, must include a length adjuster and with a maximum length of 2 m.
Clear instructions for fitting, adjustment, and use must be supplied with each belt. Markings must indicate applicable standards, the manufacturer’s name, and the product’s serial number. The year and month of manufacture should be included in or on the product packaging.

Belts and lanyards tested in accordance with EN 358 must be used only for work positioning and restraint, allowing for hands-free movement. These items must not be used as a part of, or incorporated in, a fall arrest system.

In accordance with EN358, an accredited examiner must recertify fall arrest, work positioning harnesses every 12 months (at maximum).

EN 360: Personal protective equipment against falls from a height – retractable-type fall arresters.

This European Standard describes the requirements, test methods, marking, manufacturer information, and packaging specifications for retractable-type fall arresters. Retractable-type fall arresters that conform to this standard constitute one of the fall arrest systems covered by EN 363 when combined with a full body harness as specified in EN 361. Other types of fall arresters are specified in EN 353-1 and EN 353-2. Energy absorbers are specified in EN 355.

Retractable lanyards
Devices that contain a lanyard that joins a full body harness and a secure anchorage device are available in various lengths but must retract, guided by a spring-loaded mechanism, into a drum in the device’s casing. In the case of a fall, a braking component will cause the drum to lock, arresting the fall of the wearer in as short a distance as possible.

Dynamic Performance
Retractable lanyards are subject to a drop test similar to that used for standard lanyards. Using a solid 100 kg test mass to measure arrest distance and arrest force, the drop height for this test is fixed at 600 mm, irrespective of the device’s total length. A clip is applied to the lanyard at 600 mm to prevent it from being retracted into its casing and to and allow for an unobstructed fall. The lanyard should not deploy (i.e., stretch, open, tear) beyond a maximum length of 1.4m, essentially arresting the fall within 2m from the point of release, and with a maximum arrest force of 6 kN.

Locking after Conditioning
For mechanical devices, additional testing is required to ensure they are not adversely affected by environmental conditions. Devices are checked for their locking function by dropping a mass of at least 5 kg following the devices’ conditioning at 50°C with 85 % relative humidity for at least 2 hours, at -30°C for at least 2 hours, and after being sprayed with 70 litres of water per hour for at least 3 hours. Submerging devices in diesel oil and dust are the conditions for additional, optional tests.

Static Strength
Textile lanyards are subjected to a 15 kN tensile force, metal lanyards, 12 kN. Tensile forces are applied and held for at least 3 minutes to ensure that the product’s breaking strength exceeds the force specified in the standard.

Corrosion Resistance
Metallic components used in fall protection equipment are subjected to a neutral salt spray test to determine whether the product can provide a minimum resistance to environmental corrosion (e.g., rust). Products are held in a sealed chamber filled with a saltwater mist, which can cause untreated metals to rust. Products are subjected to either 24 or 48 hours of exposure and examined thereafter for signs of rust and to assess whether each device can continue to function properly.

 

EN 361:2002: Personal protective equipment against falls from height - Full body harnesses

This European Standard describes the requirements, test methods, marking, manufacturer information, and packaging specifications for full body harnesses. Other types of body support, detailed in other European Standards (e.g., EN 358, EN 813, and EN 1497), may be incorporated into the full body harness. Fall arrest systems are detailed in EN 363.

Full body harness
Harnesses hold the wearer in place and distribute their load during fall arrest (i.e. being brought to a stop following a period of free fall).

Dynamic Performance
Harnesses are subject to a performance test in which a shock load, exceeding that likely to be experienced in use, is applied. In addition, the test will indicate the harness’ response during use, specifically the angle at which the wearer will be held in the event of a fall.

In preparation for testing, the harness is fitted to a 100 kg solid torso dummy and connected by the harness attachment to a 2m length of 11mm mountaineering rope, chosen specifically to generate a known force in the harness in the event of a fall. This rope is attached to a secure anchor point and the dummy is released over a distance of 4m. This test is conducted twice on each harness attachment, once from a head-up position and once from a head-down position (i.e. with the dummy upside down on release). To pass the test, the harness must hold the dummy following both drops, with the dummy held in a position that does not exceed 50° from the upright position. These tests are conducted on each of the harness’ attachment points.

Static Strength
Products’ tensile tests are based on a factor of safety relative to the 6 kN expected during use. Harnesses are subjected to a 15 kN tensile force applied upward followed by a 10 kN force applied downward. Lanyards are subjected to either 22 kN or 15 kN applied between the attachment points, depending on the material used. The application of an increased force tests the effects of aging (e.g., abrasion, wear and tear) on the lanyard’s protective capacity. Tensile forces are usually applied and held for at least 3 minutes to ensure the breaking strength of the product exceeds the force specified by the standard.

Corrosion Resistance
Metallic components used in fall protection equipment are subjected to a neutral salt spray test to determine whether the product can provide a minimum resistance to environmental corrosion (e.g., rust). Products are held in a sealed chamber filled with a saltwater mist, which can cause untreated metals to rust. Products are subjected to either 24 or 48 hours of exposure and examined thereafter for signs of rust and to assess whether each device can continue to function properly.

EN 362: Personal protective equipment against falls from a height – Connectors

EN 362:2004 describes the requirements, test methods, marking, manufacturer information, and packaging specification that must be supplied by manufacturer for connectors. Connectors in conformance with this European Standard are used as joining devices in personal fall protection systems (e.g., fall arrest, work positioning, rope access, restraint, and rescue systems).

Connectors
Connectors are used in systems composed of a line fixed, either temporarily or permanently, to a structure at the top only, on which a travelling device is attached. The user connects to the travelling device when ascending or descending. In the case of a fall, the travelling device should grip the line and arrest the wearer’s fall.

Static Strength
Connectors are subject to a range of tensile strength tests, applied in several directions, depending on type. If a connector has only one possible direction of loading (e.g. where one end of the connector is permanently attached to another component), loading is applied in one direction. Since misuse can result in loading being applied in a direction other than the device’s main direction, testing is required in both the major (length) axis and minor (width) axis. In addition, where connectors do not automatically lock on closure, testing is conducted with gate locked and unlocked.

In the case of EN 362 (for industrial PPE such as fall arrest systems, work restraint, work positioning, rope access, etc.), tensile loads are applied and held for 3 minutes, whereas in EN 12275 (for PPE designed for mountaineering, rock climbing, climbing walls, spelunking, and canyoneering), the load is increased to the point where breakage occurs. Therefore, it is important, when comparing products, to be aware of the standard each connector has been tested against.

Corrosion Resistance
Metallic components used in fall protection equipment are subjected to a neutral salt spray test to determine whether the product can provide a minimum resistance to environmental corrosion (e.g., rust). Products are held in a sealed chamber filled with a saltwater mist, which can cause untreated metals to rust. Products are subjected to either 24 or 48 hours of exposure and examined thereafter for signs of rust and to assess whether each device can continue to function properly.

EN 467:1995 - Protective clothing - Protection against liquid chemicals - Performance requirements for protective clothing

(EN 14605:2005 supersedes EN 467:1995)

This standard specifies the minimum requirements for clothing (e.g. aprons, sleeves, and hoods) that provides protection for the wearer against liquid chemicals and the performance requirements for the material used to manufacture chemical protective clothing. Since garments made in compliance with these requirements and those specified in EN 340 and EN 467 may be worn with garments that do not comply with these standards, this standard does not outline requirements for outfits comprised solely of chemical protective clothing.

If risks to the wearer are associated with occasional splashes from corrosive and non-volatile chemicals, type 3 chemical protective clothing is sufficient when worn in combination with protective boots, gloves, and a visor. This apparel and protective equipment provide sufficient protection against commonly encountered acids and alkalis.

Manufacturing and expiration dates (formatted as “month and year”) must be added to the clothing’s labels. In addition to the pictogram that denotes the clothing’s resistance to chemicals, the following capacities may be specified (note: a higher number indicates better performance):

• abrasion resistance class (1 to 6)
• resistance to heat blocking class (1 or 2)
• flex cracking resistance class (1 to 5)
• puncture resistance class (1 to 5)
• tear resistance class (1 to 5)
• coating adhesion strength class (1 to 5)
• resistance to permeation by liquids class (1 to 6)
• seam strength class (1 to 5)

EN 379 - Personal eye-protection - Automatic welding filters

EN 397 - Industrial safety helmets

EN 443 - Helmets for fire fighting in buildings and other structures

EN 795-B - Personal fall protection equipment - Anchor devices

EN 812 - Industrial bump caps

EN 813 - Personal fall protection equipment - Sit harnesses

EN 1496-B - Personal fall protection equipment - Rescue lifting devices

EN 12492 - Mountaineering equipment - Helmets for mountaineers - Safety requirements and test methods

EN 13688 - PROTECTIVE CLOTHING - GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

EN 13688:2013 supersedes EN 340:2004 

The standard specifies general performance requirements for ergonomics, innocuousness, size designation, aging, compatibility, and marking of protective clothing and the information to be provided by the manufacturer with the protective clothing. This standard shall be used in combination with other standards containing requirements for specific performance. 

• More detailed, general requirements for protective clothing include:
Innocuousness of the materials to the wearer.
Ergonomic requirements for the clothing including comfort, weight, and design considerations.
• The effect of wear and tear on product performance (e.g., colour alteration, cleaning, and changes in dimension).
Sizing is based on height, chest and waist circumferences, is standardized in accordance with EN 3635, and is detailed in the sizing pictogram that is included on each product’s label. EN ISO 13688 specifies that sizing intervals should not be standardized and instead favors a “flexible” approach.
Labelling requirements: labels must be visible and legible, be written in the official language of the country of destination, and include the following information:

a) Name, trademark, or other means of manufacturer identification
b) The product’s commercial name or code
c) A pictogram and size designation according to EN 3635
d) Reference to the specific EU protective clothing standard
e) A pictogram showing the hazard the product is designed to protect the wearer against and the product’s performance level
f) Composition, care, and washing instructions using care symbols in accordance with EN 3758

Instructions for the wearer must be written in the official language of country to which the products are being shipped and must include the following information:

a)      Identification and address of manufacturer
b)      Identification and address of the notified body (PPE categories 2 and 3)
c)       Reference to the specific EU protective clothing standard
d)      A pictogram showing the specific hazard the product is design addresses and the product’s performance level
e)      The product’s material composition
f)       Information to the wearer specifying safety checks that must be conducted prior to use, the purpose and limitations of the product (e.g., how long the product can be used in specific working conditions), and storage, maintenance, and cleaning instructions

EN 14387 - Respiratory protective devices - Gas filter(s) and combined filter(s) - Requirements, testing, marking

EN 50365 - Electrically insulating helmets for use on low voltage installations

ANSI Z87

ANSI Z87 - American National Standard for Occupational and Educational Eye and Face Protection

AS/NZS 1337

AS/NZS 1337 - Eye protectors for industrial applications

EN ISO 12402-2

EN ISO 12402-2: 275N - Personal flotation devices - Part 2: Lifejackets, performance level 275 - Safety requirements

(EN ISO 12402-2 supersedes EN 399.)

This part of EN ISO 12402-2 specifies the safety requirements for performance level 275 lifejackets. This applies to: lifejackets used by adults and children; lifejackets that have a buoyancy of no less than 275 N for the average adult; lifejackets that are intended for use offshore, in extreme conditions, and in combination with heavy protective clothing; and those that are worn alongside bulky loads (e.g., tool belts).

EN ISO 12402-3

EN ISO 12402-3:2006/A1: - Personal flotation devices - Part 3: Lifejackets, performance level 150 - Safety requirements

(EN ISO 12402-3 supersedes EN 396.)

This part of EN ISO 12402 specifies the safety requirements for performance level 150 lifejackets. This applies to: lifejackets used by adults and children; lifejackets that have a buoyancy of no less than 150 N for the average adult; and lifejackets that are intended for use offshore and in combination with foul weather clothing.

EN ISO 12402-4

EN ISO 12402-4:2006/A1:2010 - Personal flotation devices - Part 4: Lifejackets, performance level 100 - Safety requirements

(EN ISO 12402-4 supersedes EN 395.)

This part of EN ISO 12402 specifies the safety requirements for performance level 100 lifejackets. This applies to: lifejackets used by adults and children; lifejackets that have a buoyancy of no less than 100 N for the average adult; and lifejackets that are intended for use offshore and in combination with foul weather clothing.

EN ISO 12402-5

EN ISO 12402-5:2006 - Personal flotation devices - Part 5: Buoyancy aids, performance level 50 - Safety requirements

(EN ISO 12402-5 supersedes EN 393.)

This part of EN 12402 specifies the safety requirements for buoyancy aids with a buoyancy of no less than 50 N that are used in sheltered waters with rescue personnel closeby and under circumstances in which bulkier and buoyant devices could impair the user. These specifications apply to buoyancy aids used by adults and children who are conscious and competent swimmers.

ISO 12402-5:2006 is not applicable to one-piece suits.